Scout Camps USA - An Unofficial Guide
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What do we like to hear? Go beyond the ordinary--We get a lot of comments about a camp's size, location, and programs, but give us more than that. All that information is in the book! What we (and the Scouts and Scouters who use this feature) really like to hear are stories of adventure, discovery, and challenge. Did your camp have a special night hike, theme day, or overnight? Did something funny happen last summer that still has you cracking up? Did you or your Scouts have a once-in-a-lifetime experience? Tell us all about it!

Note: We reserve the right to edit or not post comments for any reason. Remember - no politics, whining, or complaining allowed! There are more appropriate forums for those with concerns/complaints about camps. Names are not used - only initials, city, state, and Troop number, if given.

Alabama

Camp Comer

Q: "Our troop has decided to go out of Council for summer camp. Alabama's Camp Comer or their new Xtreme Adventure Base seem to be our best option. Any listers have some info--good or bad that I might be able to pass along for our scouts?"
A: Hello!
We'll be happy to have y'all visit Comer! I attended Comer with our troop in the summer of '99. As you say, Comer is a terrific facility, and I thought the program was pretty good. It is located in the Northeast corner of the state, and can get cool at night (well, cool for Alabama in the summer). The lake stayed good & cold! Very little poison ivy (again, for Alabama!). Of course, the quality of program changes every year, but I'll tell you my experience. I was the Assistant Scoutmaster to the New Scout Patrol, so had a lot of experience with their "Pathfinder" program. The instruction for new scouts was the best boy led instruction I've seen (I didn't say perfect :-). The Pathfinder's did their program all morning, and were able to take a MB class in the afternoon. The Pathfinder instructors did their duty, and taught them well. There was some confusion about program planning -- the new scouts were told that they'd earned First Aid MB in addition to all the First Aid rank requirements, which was not accurate. The staff planned an overnighter insisting on no tents and cooking on a large rock surface -- which didn't satisfy rank advancement requirements (e.g., "Sleep in a tent you have helped pitch") and with the (predictable) rain, created a bunch of wet, hungry, annoyed new tenderfeet, who they dragged back to camp. But I've certainly planned my share of events that didn't work out like I'd hoped :-). If I had it to do over, I would take my new scouts on a separate overnighter, meeting the requirements and avoiding the inevitable problems associated with 100+ new scouts trying to camp together. For older boys, Comer offers a pretty good collection of MBs, COPE (high & low), and an off-camp whitewater trip. And a chance to do something at Camp Jackson. If you have time for a day side trip, the camp is very close to Chattanooga which has a terrific collection of Civil War battlefields and hikes. Speaking of hikes, the DeSoto Scout trail (16 miles, medal, see (http://www.sites.gulf.net/yustaga/HIKE6.htm) starts at Camp.    State List | Camp List

Camp Comer (and Sequoya)

The Greater Alabama Council operates many camps, but among those are two fully operational summer camps, Camp Comer and Camp Sequoyah. I have spoken with troops who have attended both Comer and Sequoyah. Both camps are superior in what they offer, but they are quiet different. Sequoyah offers Family Style feeding, which I love because there is absolutely no waiting in line to eat, while Comer offers Cafeteria style and the lines do get long. The bathroom facilities are air-conditioned and almost national park style at Comer, while the convenience of in-site showers with on-demand hot water heaters are available at Sequoyah. Sequoyah offers two different older boy programs, one centered on high adventure and another focusing on Advanced Scouting Skills, while Comer offers COPE and close access to another GAC camp-Camp Jackson. The Merit Badge list offered at Seqouyah is quiet extensive and well taught, and Comer offers a smaller number of Badges but they are also covered well. The troops that attend Sequoyah get an opportunity to participate in free Rifle Shooting, and various other troop activities during the afternoons. Comer offers very few organized troop activities but allows ample time to participate in other programs. The OA ceremony at Sequoyah is among the best anywhere. Camp Sequoyah also offers a Daily Newsletter entitled "The Smoke Signal" that is placed on the tables every morning at Breakfast with daily announcements and pictures from the previous days activities. A whitewater adventure is available for Scouts to travel out of state from Camp Comer, and an overnighter is available to Mount Cheaha for Mountain Biking and Rappelling from Sequoyah. The Patrol method is fully engaged and operational in Sequoyah and requires the development of boy leaders. This is just a little information on the camps that are offered in The Greater Alabama Council. I sincerely believe that Camp Sequoyah and Comer are both camps that need to be looked at to be among the best in the nation. Sequoyah, for sure, should be ranked nationally with its extensive program offerings, quality facilities, and consistent accreditations since its opening in the early 70s.
   State List | Camp List

Camp Horne

Located in east Tuscaloosa County, Camp Horne is the Black Warrior Council's main camp and is available for use year-round by all Scout units. Camp Horne is a 488 acre facility which includes two lakes; rifle, archery, and shotgun ranges; an olympic-size swimming pool; dining hall; health lodge; large and small pavilion area; two BBQ grills; Hulsart Training Center; Project COPE course; eight campsites; many hiking trails, and much more. We offer three sessions of Cub Resident Camp of 3 days and 2 nights, four sessions of Boys Scout Summer Camp 7 days and 6 nights, one session of Venturing and a week of Cub Day Camp. For more information about Camp Horne, see our web site at http://bwcbsa.tusc.net/    State List | Camp List

Camp Jackson

Camp Jackson is our Council's emerging High Adventure base located an hour west of Comer on the Tennessee River (certainly close enough to have some boys at each). Last summer, Jackson ran a program that invited older boys to leave camp and "sample" the high adventure program, even provided gear (I don't know if that's the plan this year or not). Jackson's adventures include rock climbing, mountain biking, caving, & river canoeing.

The council's web site is http://www.bsagreateralabama.org, and has more information on Comer, Jackson (and Camp Sequoyah, the other council camp running a summer camp program which we attended summer '00).

The high adventure program is run by Charlie Thorpe, who has been distributing his e-mail address, charliethorpe@worldnet.att.net, and has an electronic newsletter that he'll send you.
   State List | Camp List

Camp Sequoyah

I have been attending this camp for 9 years. It is the place to be. It is filled with activities and lots of merit badges. It has the most incredible staff you will find anywhere. I have also worked on the staff for 4 years and in doing that I can say they take pride in there work. I would take my troop there... I have visited other camps and none compare to the atmosphere of rustic camping style you receive there. When you eat your first meal at the camp at the family style dinning, you can tell you love it. I recommend anyone to come and see camp Sequoyah and stay a week.
Sincerely,    State List | Camp List

Camp Sequoyah

Camp Sequoyah is the best in Scout Camping. They have developed more programs than many other camps to address the needs of scouts of all ages. Camp Sequoyah is the only camp that I have ever attended that produces a daily newsletter to update troops on goings on as well as display digital pictures from every days activities. Camp Sequoyah sits on 1447 acres on a beautiful 80 acre lake in the shadow of Alabama's Mount Cheaha State Park. They utilize the land and the park to provide Moutain bike Trails, great hiking and incredible scout craft programs. They host an Adventure Valley obstacle course that is is incomparable. The camp operates in the pure Patrol method style, requiring SPL's and youth leadership to take an active role in their troop allowing the Adult leaders to be just what they should be- Adults who supervise and help but let the boys do the work to become better men. I am proud to say that I have been attending this camp since 1981 and have traveled and seen many neighboring camps, this one is at the top!!    State List | Camp List

Camp Sequoya (and Comer)

The Greater Alabama Council operates many camps, but among those are two fully operational summer camps, Camp Comer and Camp Sequoyah. I have spoken with troops who have attended both Comer and Sequoyah. Both camps are superior in what they offer, but they are quiet different. Sequoyah offers Family Style feeding, which I love because there is absolutely no waiting in line to eat, while Comer offers Cafeteria style and the lines do get long. The bathroom facilities are air-conditioned and almost national park style at Comer, while the convenience of in-site showers with on-demand hot water heaters are available at Sequoyah. Sequoyah offers two different older boy programs, one centered on high adventure and another focusing on Advanced Scouting Skills, while Comer offers COPE and close access to another GAC camp-Camp Jackson. The Merit Badge list offered at Seqouyah is quiet extensive and well taught, and Comer offers a smaller number of Badges but they are also covered well. The troops that attend Sequoyah get an opportunity to participate in free Rifle Shooting, and various other troop activities during the afternoons. Comer offers very few organized troop activities but allows ample time to participate in other programs. The OA ceremony at Sequoyah is among the best anywhere. Camp Sequoyah also offers a Daily Newsletter entitled "The Smoke Signal" that is placed on the tables every morning at Breakfast with daily announcements and pictures from the previous days activities. A whitewater adventure is available for Scouts to travel out of state from Camp Comer, and an overnighter is available to Mount Cheaha for Mountain Biking and Rappelling from Sequoyah. The Patrol method is fully engaged and operational in Sequoyah and requires the development of boy leaders. This is just a little information on the camps that are offered in The Greater Alabama Council. I sincerely believe that Camp Sequoyah and Comer are both camps that need to be looked at to be among the best in the nation. Sequoyah, for sure, should be ranked nationally with its extensive program offerings, quality facilities, and consistent accreditations since its opening in the early 70s.
   State List | Camp List

Alaska

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   State List | Camp List


Arizona

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   State List | Camp List


Arkansas

Camp Orr

Visit Camp Orr on the Buffalo River National Park. The scouts enjoyed the Ozark scenery and most of the adults enjoyed Branson, Missouri. It was a vacation for the entire family.
J.B., Texas    State List | Camp List

Camp Pioneer

During the week of June 10-16, our troop attended summer camp at Camp Pioneer, http://www.camppioneer.org, near Mena, Arkansas in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains. The camp, operated by the Caddo Area Council in Texarkana, Texas, is 430 miles from where we live. This was our first visit to Camp Pioneer.

This was my 21st trip to summer camp and the 10th different camp I've attended. From an overall standpoint, I rate Camp Pioneer among the top two or three camps I've experienced.

We had a large campsite for our 36 Scouts and 10 adults. The site had a large covered shelter with electricity, a storage building and a latrine with hot water showers. Wall tents with platforms were provided. We had significant rainfall on Thursday night and the tents stood up well with only a few minor leaks.

We enjoyed the cool nights and low humidity which is different from what we usually experience at Texas summer camps in our area. It did warm up to the low 90s during most days but this wasn't a major problem as our campsite was very shaded.

Camp Pioneer had the most enthusiastic and friendly camp staff I've seen. They lined up in the entrance to the dining hall and sung to us at each meal. The camp was adequately staffed, something I can't say for some of the camps we've attended during the past few years.

Generally, the merit badge classes were excellent and our Scouts enjoyed them. One of our Scouts caught 42 fish while working on the Fishing merit badge. We didn't have any Scouts in the first year camper program but a couple of adults from other troops seemed to rate the program well.

In addition to the merit badge program, Camp Pioneer offered an extensive program of special activities for older Scouts. This included an outstanding C.O.P.E. program, mountain biking in three classifications, an excellent mountain man program, a climbing wall, a rappelling tower and the opportunity to take part in a special 17 mile hike on Friday. We had Scouts in all the special programs, and the reports I heard were very positive.

On the negative side, the camp food wasn't very good at a couple of meals. The enchiladas were especially bad. The dining hall is too small to feed everyone at once so meals were served in two shifts. We were in the second shift and the food was not always warm plus they ran out of a couple of items. We were there the first week of camp so this will probably improve as the summer continues.

The only other negative aspect was that our campsite had a great deal of poison ivy and many, many ticks. The Caddo Area Council needs to work on this and we mentioned these problems in our camp evaluation.

Overall, we had a great week at Camp Pioneer and our Scouts voted overwhelmingly to add the camp to our summer camp rotation. Camp Pioneer is an excellent summer camp opportunity, especially for troops in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and even western Tennessee.

YiS,
C.H.G., Scoutmaster, Troop 405
Advisor, Venturing Crew 405
Georgetown, Texas
I used to be an Owl (WM-62-2-98 @ Philmont)
   State List | Camp List

California

Camp Chawanakee

Fresno, CA. Sequoia Council Summer Camp, located at 5280 ft. on Shaver Lake in the mountains of Fresno County. The Staff is a group of dedicated scouts and scouters that go all out to see that your week's stay is enjoyable and rewarding courses offered are: Scoutcraft area - Trail to first class, cooking, pioneering, wild. surv. camping, etc/Nature Area-Env. Sci., forestry, nature, fishing, fish & wildlife, etc./Aquatics-Swimming, Life Saving, Canoeing, Sailing,etc./Hobby Craft-Rifle shoot, Leather work, basketry, art, etc./Trail of Chawanakee where a scout/scouter must do five different trails and a mile swim/Tribe of Chawankee where scouts/scouters perform various service hours performed over a five yr. period. Horse trail & canoe outpost over-nighter/Cope course/and inthe summer of 2000, an adventure scout course that will challenge the older scouts in a 5 day hike in the rugged Sierra mts-Sequoia forrest.
J&M S    State List | Camp List

Camp Fleischmann

Super Camp, Great staff, beautiful lake, I loved the programs. I can't wait for my next chance to go.
I completely missed the Camp Fleischmann write-up in your guide book. I started with the map on page 6 and saw Camp Lassen (CA23) and the Mataguay Reservation (CA26) in the area where Camp Fleischmann is. Your map has the locations for Camp Fleischmann and the Mataguay Reservation reversed. Warner Springs (Mataguay Reservation) is in Southern California. Camp Fleischmann is near Lassen Volcanic National Park. [ed: corrected in Second Edition]
Otherwise, I think your description of Fleischmann is fine. Blue Lake is a beautiful, warm alpine lake 1/4 mile across. Waterfront activities include the standards plus Small Boat Sailing and 1-mile swim. Overnight experiences include remote meadows or a saddle on the shoulder of Mt. Harkness. The adventure hike up Mt Harkness is challenging because there is no trail! When our Scouts went up there two years ago they had a snowball fight in the snow bowl at the summit (in July!).
- Robert    State List | Camp List

Camp Marin-Sierra

Camp Marin-Sierra is a beautiful site occupied by a well-conceived, well-developed, excellently maintained Boy Scout camp used in both summer and winter. The program areas are nicely laid out and manned with a trained and dedicated staff of energetic men and women. Chubb Lake, at the center of the camp, is the back drop of the central assembly area, which is just West of the main parking lot. To the East of the parking lot is the med shack and to the south are the staff cabins and the commissary. Meals are served at the outdoor, wooden tables at the commissary for those choosing the central eating option. Alternatively, troops may opt for jamboree-style eating where meal ingredients are delivered to the camp sites and prepared by the occupying troop. Scoutcraft, handicrafts, and C.O.P.E. course are a short walk from the assembly area, and a little further out are the shooting sport areas (shotgun, rifle, and archery).

Dotted among the program areas, but never too close, are the individual campsites. Each is equipped with a fire ring and fire tools, Bakers' tents on wooden platforms and a wooden latrine. Additional, well-maintained latrines are situated at various locations along the most heavily travel paths. This camp is everything a Scout or Scouter could wish for.

M.L.S.    State List | Camp List

Camp Oljato

comment added 05/09/2003

In 2002, our troop went to the first session of Camp Oljato. Our troop is very large, about 94 plane tickets were bought. This Camp was on Lake Huntington, which is frozen all but 3 months of the year. We arrived, and were settled. Most of the Camp Staff was very well suited for the job, with only a few who weren't quite prepared for a troop of our size. The program director there was loved by all. His name was Joe, and I am sure that he is wanted by almost every single camp. The food was the best that I have had in my 5 years of being in Boy Scouts. The dining was a bit small before the Trek left, but after that, it was fine. They have an excellent COPE course, water sports, shooting sports, and high adventure program. I am sure that if we went out of state every year, we would never leave Oljato. Also, this Camp did something interesting that most other camps do not. They have their own version of Olympics, called the Oljatocade. This included among other things, swamped canoe race, a Pentathalon (canoeing, trail running, swimming, eating and "tearing off of duct tape"), horse shoes, "THE CHALLENGE"; which is very secret. The campsites were nice, except for the fact that they didn't have very much level land. The worst part of this camp was the lake water, which was 62 degrees F; and the other bad part was leaving, because Camp Oljato is the best.

R.T., Scout, Troop 1000, Richmond, Texas    State List | Camp List

Colorado

Camp Alexander

(comment added 09/24/2002)

My boys want to return to Camp A (as we call it) because of the enormous amount of activities, location, and camp staff.

Activities most liked by the boys are: Rifle, Shotgun, Swimming, Indian camp, Kava, Boating, Canoeing, Nature, Wildlife and many, many more.

Location: Nestled in the heart of the Rocky Mountains

Camp Staff: Consists of international Scouts as well as local Scouts, all very good at what they do.

S.T., Troop 62    State List | Camp List

Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch

Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch is by far the best scout camp that our troop has ever attended and I would highly recommend it to anyone looking for a new camp to visit. The staff was extremely fun friendly and helpful. They had one of the best programs I have ever encountered. Keep up the good work! We hope to see you all again soon. Thanks for the memories.
Troop 181 Franklin TN    State List | Camp List

Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch

(comment added 09/24/2002)

Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch outside Elbert, Colorado (South and East of Denver Metro Area) is the largest scout camp in Colorado. While not in the mountains, its still 6500 feet in elevation (higher than Denver), and has a great view of the Colorado Rockies from everywhere on the ranch. It's actually made up of 2 camps, Dobbins (dining hall, 250-300 campers, and MBs galore) and Deitler (patrol cooking, camp's tents and limited to about 100 boys) and same MB program. Our favorite is Deitler. The boys do patrol cooking and get ready for their Scouting careers by learning to cook and clean. We like East Tin Cup campsite as it provides an unobstructed view of Pike's Peak to the West and gorgeous vistas all around. Deitler has a great new Scout program and a great older boy high adventure program that included (as of 2001) mountain biking, mountain climbing at Pike's Peak, rapelling, etc. etc. Have a great time!

J.U., Scoutmaster, T457, DAC    State List | Camp List

Connecticut

Camp Sequassen

(comment added 09/24/2002)

Camp Sequassen near Winstead, Connecticut has been a favorite with our troop during the winters. There are great lean to's and an abundance of firewood. We actually like it best when there is a nice snow cover and a great fire can be built. We usually bring plastic sleds to drag wood on and to bring gear down to the lean to's.

The camp is quite large and there are many trails to explore.

D.K.

   State List | Camp List

Delaware

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Florida

Camp Shands

(comment added 10/04/2002)

[What makes this camp so special is...] The treehouses. the shooting range (rifle, shotgun, and black powder). Also, the C.O.P.E. course, the climbing course. The food. The trading post. The merit badge offered. The BMX course. Being on staff. The campfire programs. Sports, handicrafts, scoutcrafts, etc... The evening programs. Intertroop programs. OA night, etc.... fun...fun...fun... the fellowship and friends made at camp....

J.F. Troop 360    State List | Camp List

Florida National High Adventure Sea Base

(comment added 08/09/2002)

Crew 574 (an all-girl crew) returned just a few weeks ago from Sea Base's Out Island Adventure program. We had a blast! Parents keep telling me that their daughters can't stop talking about their experiences and the girls are claiming they have SBWS (Sea Base Withdrawal Syndrome). Although it's pricey ($500 for a week plus transportation) and we raked mountains of leaves to get there, I'd strongly recommend it to other Venturing Crews--male, female, or coed. We caught an island-record mahi mahi, as well as many of its cousins, taught the staff that you really can eat shark (and how good it is), snorkeled with barracuda, did a low COPE course, paddled war canoes through a storm (this leader was, frankly, scared during that experience), and had too many other wonderful experiences to mention.

I should add that these girls were pretty hard core before they attended, with over half having completed their 50-miler award. They also tended to be a little older (16-20) than the average attendee.

They're looking for a 2003 challenge since their efforts to get into Philmont through either call-in or council contingents have been unsuccessful.

YIV,
DV, Crew Advisor

We were quite impressed with the operation there. I'll add one caveat: Make sure when you are making transportation arrangements from the airport to the Brinton Center that you stress Brinton Center, not Sea Base itself, to the limo companies. We had a slight disconnect in getting to the Brinton center as a result of this--nothing that interfered with the program or that was attributable to Sea Base.

   State List | Camp List

Winn-Dixie Scout Reservation-Camp La-No-Che

This Camp has everything a Scout is looking for in order to have a great time at summer camp. Large lake for all aquatics, olympic-sized pool, Rifle Range, Shotgun Range, Archery Range, Camp Craft skills, & Ecology. I have been to Camp La-no-che now over five summer camps in the last ten years. It's a wonderful camp, and the staff is well ran and will help you with anything that is wrong. You'll enjoy this camp. On a scale of 1-10, I rank it a 8 1/2 .
W.S.E., Scoutmaster, Troop 359
Central Florida Council    State List | Camp List

Georgia

Camp Sidney Dew

comment added 05/09/03

Camp Sidney Dew, located between Rome, GA and Dalton, GA, offers a great summer program. The council is one of the smallest in the country, but the camp is first class. Nice mixture of rustic campsites and modern bathhouses. The OA tapout pageant on Friday evening is one of the best I have ever seen.

T. M.    State List | Camp List

Chattahoochee Scout Reservation-Camp Lumpkin

Program was good except that the first year program had too many boys for the amount of staff. Facilities were good. Nice Swimming pool, nice bath house, excellent dining hall. Food was lacking. Not enough food and the nutritional value was nonexistent. We were told that this would be fixed next year. The same thing was said last year.    State List | Camp List

Thunder Scout Reservation

Camp was excellent this year. Faciliities were very good with constant improvements being made. Food service was much improved. Merti Badges offered gave a full range of activities. High Adventure program including out of camp programs are underutilized. Good value for dollars spent.    State List | Camp List

Hawaii

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   State List | Camp List


Idaho

Camp Loll

Hi, Camp Loll is great -- best scout camp we ever attended!
Last year our Troop 139 and Troop 644 from the Los Angeles area spent an exciting week at the camp on the Lake of the woods located just 1 mile south of Yellowstone Natl. Pk. This is a wilderness camp so be prepared! This camp has the most scout spirit, a friendly and helpful staff and a location second to none. Bring your troop and be ready for fun and adventure!

J. G. ASM
Troop 139
Sherman Oaks CA    State List | Camp List

Camp Loll

Camp Loll is located in Wyoming, not Idaho. It is operated by the Trapper Trails Council.

Don    State List | Camp List
[ed: In Scout Camps USA, we place Camp Loll in Idaho, because its camp post office is in Idaho. However, as this reader points out, the camp is actually just over the border of Wyoming. See the "guide to the guide" section of Scout Camps USA for a full explanation of how we place the camp marks.]

Illinois

Camp Lowden

This is one of the best summer camps that I have been to. There is a great staff with many fun things to do. We had a lot of fun during camp between swimming in the pool to canoeing at the riverfront of the Rock River to just kicking back with some new-found friends and sharing stories. The shooting gallery is great, and scoutcraft was a lot of fun. Handicraft was well stocked with plenty to keep a person busy for a lifetime. I wasn't lucky enough to get to go to the nature lodge, but my friends said it was great. The food was good, and the people at the trading post were the best. You could just sit and talk with them. It is like they knew what was going on in the camp at all times. It was a lot of fun. It is going to make me come back year after year, and [want] to be on camp staff some year.
Star Scout Blackhawk Area Council
Johnsburg, Illinois    State List | Camp List

Camp Lowden

Lowden is an excellent little camp near Oregon, Illinois. The facilities are getting a little old, but they are making improvements. It has been there since 1940. Out troop went there this summer and thoroughly enjoyed our stay. The staff is the best I have seen in 5 years of going to camp with my sons. I would recommend it to anyone.

Indiana

Camp Chief Little Turtle

Located in the heart of northeastern Indiana's lake country, Camp Chief Little Turtle is one of many camps on the Anthony Wayne Scout Reservation (1200 acres of beautiful lakes, forest and streams). To locate CCLT go south of Angola, Indiana, approximately 4 miles to Pleasant Lake, Indiana, then go west on county road 500 S approximately 1 mile.
--BW    State List | Camp List

Iowa

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   State List | Camp List


Kansas

Quivira Scout Ranch

(comment added 05/09/2003)

Quivira Scout Ranch is located on 3,146 beautiful, wooded acres of the Chautaqua Hills, in southeastern Kansas. The ranch property features a 473 acre lake, with tournament-class bass fishing, and rugged terrain.

The vision for Quivira Scout Ranch began to develop in 1953 when the Quivira Council Executive Board appointed Murray Gill to seek out a property for a new scout camp. In 1960, the property was purchased from nine different landowners for 2,906 acres of wooded hills and narrow valleys. In 1972, the final tract of land was purchased, making the ranch 3,146 acres. Rich in tradition, this land provided homesteads, farms and ranches for many pioneers, as the federal government encouraged settlement, beginning in the 1870's. Many remnants of these old settlements remain today!

Perhaps the most attractive feature of QSR is the lake. Named after Murray Gill, the lake and dam provides for 473 surface acres of water and 5,000 acre feet of flood control for the Caney River Valley, below. Furthermore, Murray Gill Lake is host to a variety of aquatics activities as well as several annual bass fishing tournaments.

C.L.,    State List | Camp List

Theodore Naish Scout Reservation

(comment added 05/09/2003)

Located West of the Kansas City Metro in the rolling hills of Bonner Springs, KS is one of the Nation's busiest (year-round) Scout Reservations. This beautiful camp features moderate to challenging hiking on its 12.5 hiking trail known as the Rim-rock Trail; 1100 acres to explore; 3 seperate camps (South, Central & Cub World) and runs all 3 programs regularly: Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts & Venturing. This site is also the home of one of the Nation's best O/A programs: the Tamegonit Lodge(#147) which offers programs throughout the year(Winter Banquet, 2 Spring Induction Weekends, Summer Camp inductions/ceremonies, Fall Induction Weekend & finalied by the exciting Fall Fellowship)...

After completing the 2003 Summer camp season we will begin the process of renewing most all of the bldgs. in Central Camp which will be: an 800 seat cafeteria; new pool & shower-house; trading post/handicraft area; adjoining parking lot; headquarters & 2 new theme areas to Cub World, a "Lost-Mine" shaft & a water park including a full sized wooden (pirate)ship. For more information on this wonderful camp & the programs we offer throught the year visit our Heart of America Council website...

Below is a brief history FYI:

History/General Information about Theodore Naish Scout Reservation-

The 1100-acre reservation is named for Theodore R. Naish, an Englishman born in Birmingham, England on June 21, 1856. In the late 1800's, he moved to Kansas City, Kansas and, in 1889, took a job working as a civil engineer and draftsman for the city. He often hiked in this part of the country, and these woods and hills were one of his favorite places. Consequently, shortly before marrying Belle Saunders in 1911, he purchased 180 acres of land among the Kaw River in the area now known as South Camp. There he found refuge from the city in the summer months and often took his Sunday school classes with him.

Mr. Naish sailed for Europe with his wife on the ship "Lusitania" in 1915 to visit relatives, but he died when the ship was sunk by a German torpedo. Mrs. Naish survived, but Theordore's body was never found. Upon returning to the property, Mrs. Naish donated 90 acres of land to the Kaw Council in June, 1926 as a memorial to her husband. (The Kaw Council and Kansas City Area Council merged in 1975 to form the present day Heart of America Council.)

That summer, a director and bugler conducted four sessions of camp on the property near the present day South Camp flag mall for 150 boys. At that time, the water supply was a well, and hiking, archery and baseball were the major programs. By 1931, an entrance road from K-32 highway was completed, and construction on the first permanent buildings on the reservation finished. By 1933, the camp has a dining hall, rifle range and four permanent campsites. In 1948, the Scout Camp swimming pool was erected, bringing an end to the use of the old Beaver Pond for swimming. The site it was built on now serves as the Scout Camp parking lot. The old pool was buried under between 1979 and 1982.

Use of South Camp increased rapidly and, in 1959, Central Camp was established and put into use. The Central Camp dining hall was built the next year, and with its completion, large growth in the use of this portion of the reservation began. Other structures soon followed in Central Camp. The last major building to be built, up until the Order of the Arrow lodge's Great House in the 1980's, was the handicraft lodge in 1971. The current Reservation Ranger's home was constructed in between the completion of them.

D.M.,    State List | Camp List

Kentucky

Camp Crooked Creek

Hello,
Camp Crooked Creek in the Lincoln Heritage Council is one of the best camps I've ever been to!!! It is asbsolutely fabulous. The staff really seems to care about the boys. The waterfront program is superb. The best feature of the camp is the ecology and conservation department. The eco department is one of the few camps in the nation that offer the T.R.A.I.L. Boss (Teaching Resources and Individual Leadership) program. Not only is it offered, it is offered with true quality. The environmental science merit badge is the best taught program I've ever seen. The camp has much to offer, but the E Science merit badge is worth the trip by itself.
I can't stress enough how incredible Camp Crooked Creek is!!!
Sincerely,
JK, Scouter    State List | Camp List

Louisiana

Camp T.L. James

Super camp, Great staff, beautiful lake, I loved the programs. I can't wait for my next chance to go.
   State List | Camp List

Maine

Camp Roosevelt

Camp Roosevelt is situated in the woods of Maine on Little Fitts Ponds in Eddington. This camp has been in existence for generations! I am not sure of the exact date the camp began; however, I know the program was up and running in 1939 when my Dad attended a two-week session!. The original log-built dining hall is still being used today, it is said that this was built sometime in the 1920s. Forty-three years after my Dad attended Camp Roosevelt, my son started his first year there. He enjoyed the program and came home with plans to go again the following year. For three years my son attened C.R. as a camper earning many merit badges and making friends from all over Maine as well as the rest of the country.
He then became part of the staff and spent the next two years teaching Mammal Study, Astronomy & Geology. While teaching Scouts he was also advancing in rank himself which the Camp encourages all Counselors to do. In 1997 my son received the rank of Eagle Scout. Camp Roosevelt has played a tremendously important role in the shaping of many young lives in this community. Camp Roosevelt has much to offer any Scout--new or veteran. There is an excellent Water Front Program, Rifle, Shotgun & Archery Ranges, Nature Studies, Crafts, Cooking and much more. C. R. also offers specialty weeks for older Scout, Explorers & Varsity Scout Troops. There is a wonderful staff at C.R. and the scenery is, of course, gorgeous!! Even though this may be one of the oldest B.S.A. camp in the country, don't let that deter you. C.R. has all the modern conviences as well as the old North Woods charm. I am proud that we in Maine have such a wonderful camp to send our boys to , and I encourage all Scouts everywhere to go to camp !!!
   State List | Camp List

Camp William Hinds

Camp William Hinds, in Raymond, Maine, is a large summer camp equipped with courses for first year Scouts and C.O.P.E. and other programs designed specifically for older boys (14 and up). They have many merit badge options including waterfront activities, arts & crafts, nature, outdoor activities and technology. Willing are staff always there to provide support and encouragement for Scouts and adults attending. Home-cooked meals provided by a local catering company (no complaints from the boys). All Scouts in and outside Pine Tree Council are welcome.    State List | Camp List

Maryland

Broad Creek Memorial Scout Reservation

Boad Creek Memorial Scout Reservation is the Council camp of the Baltimore Area Council. The reservation offers a Boy Scout summer camp program at Camp Saffran and Camp Spencer, and a summer Cub Scout Residence camp at Camp Oest. All three camps offer winter camping as well.    State List | Camp List

Camp Potomac

Great first- and second-year Scout Camp. Super staff with a fantastic can-do attitude. Not much on the High Adventure side for the older Scouts.
T. O., Dumfries, VA    State List | Camp List

Massachusetts

Cape Cod Maritime Adventure

In response to the request for information on more-adventurous camping activities for older Scouts, let me tell you about the Cape Cod Maritime Adventure we have. We are a peninsula with many resources not found in your average Scout camp program!

Scouts spend their week biking the Cape Cod Rail Trail along the "bare and bended arm" of Cape Cod (our bikes or yours) and camping overnight in Adirondacks at Camp Greenough. A gear wagon is provided, as are all meals, snacks, and lots of water! Activites include: Learn sea kayaking, a whale watch trip, time with the shellfish warden learning about aquaculture, a trip on a working lobster boat to pull traps and learn related ecology, a day in historic Provincetown including the dunes, evening surf-casting for sea bass, and many other opportunities. The finale on the last night is an authentic Cape Cod clambake put together by the Scouts, with a hot coal bed, seaweed, corn on the cob, clams, potatoes, sausage, and nice big lobsters.

We visited with a troop from West Virginia on their last evening of the week and had a ball showing them how to eat clams and lobsters. The Scouts, all age 14+ (the biking is moderately strenuous), felt that this was THE best adventure any of them had ever seen-- and some of them had also just returned from Jamboree! The Council is making up a promotional tape showing highlights of their week and I think it will be available. Contact the Cape Cod and Islands Council at 508-326-4322.

YiS
Auntie Beans
Cape Cod & Island Council, MA
Training Chair
Abake MiSaNaKe Lodge #393
NEI-188 "I useta be an eagle..."
NSJ 1997, 2001 Health & Safety
   State List | Camp List

Michigan

Camp Madron

Camp Madron, at the Rota Kiwan Scout Reservation in Texas Township, is just southwest of Kalamazoo, Michigan. It is owned and operated by the Southwest Michigan Council. It offers a veriety of merit badges at six different locations around the camp. The camp has been in operation for over 50 years. It overlooks beautiful Bass Lake, and it is right next to the El Sabo Land Preserve. It's a great rustic summer camp experience in the beautiful woods around Kalamazoo.
YIS,
A.T., Troop 218    State List | Camp List

Gerber Boy Scout Camp

comment added 10/04/02

[What makes Gerber special is that...] the private lake is a big thrill for the boys and they love the staff. The staff is a really neat group of people who really care about what they are doing. The facilities are the best we have ever seen at a Scout camp.


S.H., Troop 1006    State List | Camp List

Northwoods Scout Reservation

Northwoods Scout Reservation is the summer camp for the Chief Okemos Council. Located near Lupton, Michigan, and the Rifle River, the camp offers a full range of merit badge classes and features a brand-new dining hall this year. Northwoods is also the home of the Michigan International Camporee being held in August 2000.
For more information see our web site: http://members.aol.com/northwoodsbsa/nwoods.htm.
S.C.    State List | Camp List

Owasippe Scout Reservation

Owasippe S.R. is the oldest Boy Scout camp in the world with continious operation. Approximately 5,000 acres, which border the Manistee National Forest, located just northwest of Grand Rapids. Owned and operated by the Chicago area council: http://www.chicagobsa.org.
   State List | Camp List

Minnesota

Camp Wilderness

Camp Wilderness is located near Park Rapids, Minnesota, and is operated by the Northern Lights Council. The Council's main Service Center is located in Fargo, North Dakota. Camp Wilderness offers year-round camping experiences, having heated cabins available for winter camping and a full summer of week-long camp.
Winter activities include hiking, skiing, snowshoeing, ice fishing, and the always popular sliding hill. Earn your zero hero badge by sleeping out in below-zero weather.
Summer brings a full camp program of boating, swimming, canoeing, fishing, camping, cooking, shooting, cope, and more merit badge earning opportunities.
   State List | Camp List

Mississippi

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Missouri

Camp Geiger

Camp Geiger is the best camp ever. I have been going there for four years, and Camp Geiger has of the best percentage of returning scouts. Camp Geiger also is one of the only two camps that has the Tribe of Mic-O-Say. Camp Geiger is one of the top ten camps in the nation. Camp Geiger was the birthplace of the popular activity for older scouts, C.O.P.E. If you are looking for a new camp for your troop to go to, you should really consider Camp Geiger. Be one of the few.
   State List | Camp List

H. Roe Bartle Scout Reservation

. . .I was on the Commissioner Staff for a session at the H. Roe Bartle Scout Reservation during the fourth of their six sessions. Although I was working as a Commissioner during the session, the troop that I'm associated with also camps during this session so I kinda get info from both sides....here's my evaluation of this ten-day camp:

The H. Roe Bartle Scout reservation consists of three separate camps (Piercing Arrow, Sawmill, and Lone Star) set in the hills of Southern Missour on Truman Lake. Each camp has its own dining hall, pool facility (separate men's/women's/boy's hot showers), craft lodge, ecology lodge, nature lodge, craft lodge, and Micosay lodge.

Communal facilities include the archery range, rifle range, shotgun range, COPE facility, climbing tower, scoutcraft lodge, basketball courts, Micosay Council ring, and Micosay Tribal areas.

Dining Hall/Food: A+++....even the most "picky" of our Scouts thought the food was terrific! Entrees included chicken filets (REAL ones!), homemade pizzas, some good goolash, and salads at least ever other day. Yep, it was a little "heavy" for those of us who might prefer a lighter menu, but, hey, the boys loved it! PLENTY of food. The organization of the dining facility was sterling! The meal programs were quite entertaining....in spite of the fact that I got thrown in the pool by the Micosay Tribal "Runners" fully-clothed on two occasions!

Campfire Programs: A....The Tribe of Micosay pervades the campfire programs (three evening camp-wide ceremonies and two Tribal events that draw over 1000 attendees from the three camps and the surrounding states) were excellent. The staff in each camp is well rehearsed for the opening and closing campfires, and they have wonderful support from the songs and skits of the attending troops.

Waterfront: B+ The only problem with the offerings at the waterfront (which include 16-man war canoes just for fun!) is that they can't handle everyone who wants to do the waterfront MBs (waterskiing, rowing, canoeing, smallboat sailing, etc). They also offer free-time boating, but getting a lottery-drawn spot in the merit badge class can be troublesome. They did much better this year, but it's still a bit of a problem. Also, the waterfront is a bit of a walk for some scouts....about two miles from our camp.

Pools: A++ Excellently staffed.....absolutely first-rate! Free swims for both troops and a separate "leaders swim" as well as water polo tournaments in the evenings.

Other Programs: A...As commissioners, we take evaluation forms from each troop. The evaluations on each lodge were quite good. Excellent program offerings (over 35 MBs offered) including pottery, oceanography, astronomy, art, wilderness survival, as well as all the traditional offerings.

Medical Lodge: A++++ A fully-staffed lodge with four treatment tables. They handle most emergencies on the spot including stitches and in-house hospitalization for minor ailments in a small "hospital-type" ward. I believe the medical staff include two full-time RNs, one EMT, one records/staff person and a full-time MD/DO.

Supplimentary Programs: Great COPE course, rappelling, Indian Villiage, Skeet shooting, Mountain Bike, etc. Dining hall will support any "out of dining hall" event the troop wishes to partake of with food (either troop-cooked or sack lunch) given 24-hour notice. Hiking to Iconium, MO (5-miles RT) to Scott's General Store for a peach float is a truly amazing event. (PLEASE see www.scottsiconiumstore.com) and read the "guest book" section.

Okay, now that you've read about this great Scout reservation..........sorry, it's pretty much full every session of every year!!! Reservation capacity is around 2,000 per session for six sessions.

Blue Skies!
J.P. (Kanzas Variety) Brotherhood, Tamegonit Lodge
ADC Pelathe District, HOAC Micosay: HW Shieldmaker
ASM Troop 55, Lawrence, KS Eagle Class of 1963

Any day above ground is a good day!
   State List | Camp List

S Bar F Scout Ranch

S-F Scout Ranch has three Scout camps and one Explorer/Venture base located on a 240-acre lake located amongst the foothills of the Missouri Ozarks. It offers great programs in aquatics, scoutcraft and nature. The Scouts enjoy fishing and overnight canoe floats. Other program activities include a rock climbing and rapelling course, as well as a high- and low-ropes confidence courses.
J.G.    State List | Camp List

Montana

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Nebraska

Camp Cedars

comment added 08/17/02

This is a wonderful camp. A little buggy in the summer, but a great scouting experience. They also host a wide variety of merit badges.
G.S.   State List | Camp List

Nevada

Camp Potosi

Camp Potosi was pretty fun. Really hot and dusty with good staff and lots of merit badges.
   State List | Camp List

New Hampshire

Camp Wanoket

Camp Wanoket is in Jaffery, New Hampshire, and it is great. It is located right under Mt. Monadnock, plenty of hiking trails, is on a lake, and all you see is woods, a wonderful site, almost like the rich girls' camp across the lake. Don't worry they have that under control. The activities include small boat sailing, canoing, archery and rifle/shotgun shooting just to name a few. A great place to spend a week anytime!
   State List | Camp List

New Jersey

Camp NoBeBosCo

A beautiful camp located off the Appalachian Trail in Northwest NJ. Close to the Delaware River. Has ten cabins, all with gas heat and electricity as well as many tent sites and a lean-to site. A large lake (Sand Pond) has fishing. An excellent Boy Scout summer camp program has aquatics, boating, shooting sports, horseback riding, typical summer merit badges and excellent food.
MS, Asst. Scoutmaster
Troop 3, Caldwell, NJ
   State List | Camp List

New Mexico

Camp Frank Rand

This camp was one of my faviorite camps. The quality of the camp was great! They had all the right equipment for all the classes. I was surprised at how good the camp was, although the tents could have been a lot better. If I had the chance to go back I would take it. Camp Frank Rand is great for all ages.
--B.    State List | Camp List

Camp Tres Ritos

Camp Tres Ritos is a semi-primitive camp as each troop cooks for themselves. Along with the backpacking, they also offer traditional camp merit badge activities.
YIS,
W.C., Scoutmaster, Troop 192
El Paso, TX    State List | Camp List

Camp Tres Ritos

I didn't see the South Plains Council's camps, Camp Post and Tres Ritos, listed. Tres Ritos, or TR as it is known in the Council, offers a Pecos Packers backpacking trip that some troops use a substitute for or warm-up to Philmont. Any reason for omitting us?
W.C., Scoutmaster, Troop 590
South Plains Council, Lubbock, TX

[ed: The First Edition listed only long-term summer camps; however, happily, both of these camps are listed in the Second Edition, along with hundreds of other short-term and Cub speciality camps!]
   State List | Camp List

Wehinahpay Mountain Camp

Excellent Camp!

Another leader and I took five boys this year and had a wonderful time. If you prefer cool weather, then Wehinahpay is the place for you. The staff and camp director put their best foot forward and laid out an excellent program. Our boys learned many new skills and had a great time doing it. Just make sure that you are in shape for climbing.
T.L., Scoutmaster, Troop 57
Crane, Texas    State List | Camp List

New York

Curtis S. Read Scout Reservation

The Curtis S. Read Scout Reservation is the summer resident camp run by the Westchester Putnam Council. It is situated in the middle of Adirondak State park, and is in a prime location for the ultimate camp experience. There are three camps on the Reservation. Camp Wabeeka is the patrol cooking camp, where each troop cooks their own food, which they pick up half an hour before meal time. The second camp, Camp Buckskin, is the Dining hall camp, which provides three meals a day. Summit Base is the third camp. This is the high adventure base, which leads treks into the surrounding park areas, and the high peaks region of the Adirondaks. Camps Wabeeka and Buckskin both offer a diverse range of merit badges in Ecology, Handicrafts, Scoutcraft, field sports, and waterfront. Climbing merit badge is offered at Summit Base, along with Project C.O.P.E., Rock Climbing, and other assorted programs. The sessions are one week long; however, there is a provisional troop on reservation, and troops can stay for however many weeks they want. There is also a one-week Webelo Program, and a one-week Cub Scout program. The reservation has just celebrated its fifty-year anniversary in 1999. It is a great place, I have gone there for six years now, and I highly recommend it to anyone who wants the ultimate camp experience.
In scouting,
-M    State List | Camp List

Onteora Scout Reservation

Theodore Roosevelt Council's "Land in the Sky", Onteora provides an excellent two-week program which includes plenty of activities and high adventure for Scouts of all ages. This beautiful camp is located in the Catskills outside of Livingston Manor, New York, about 130 miles from NYC. The camp operates for two weeks in early August.
L.K., Scoutmaster
Troop 43, Sea Cliff, NY    State List | Camp List

Ten Mile River Scout Reservation - Camp Kunatah

Camp Kunatah is one of the camps at the Greater New York Council's Ten Mile River Scout Reservation. This camp is unique in the United States in that it provides kosher food and a Sabbath-observant schedule for the first three weeks of the summer. This allows observant Jewish Scouts to attend a first-class Scout camp. A resident Rabbi runs daily Jewish services.
M.S., Assistant Scoutmaster
Troop 118, West Orange, NJ    State List | Camp List

North Carolina

Bonner Scout Reservation

I would like to comment about Camp Bonner. They had an enthusiastic staff, and most went out of their way to assist the Scouts in completing the Merit Badges. The Pool was nice, and most facilities were centrally located. They also have a Sea Base there that my son wants to attend to do a kayaking trek on the Core Banks. Definitely recommend this camp.

P.F., Troop 1378, Dale City, VA
   State List | Camp List

Camp Bud Schiele

I'm commenting on Camp Bud Schiele in North Carolina. I am a Boy Scout in Troop #551 of the Dogwood District in the Old Hickory Council in North Carolina. I just spent a week at Camp Bud Schiele and got back today (6-17-00). It is a great camp with beautiful views and a great lake. The staff there is awesome and "they're all like a big family" like my Woodcarving teacher nicknamed "Shotgun" told me. Their food is good and on the Wednesday of the week I was there, the Boy Scout Inspection people came to inspect the camp, and it got 99% efficiency rating, or something like that. 5 stars, two thumbs-up!
   State List | Camp List

Camp Grimes

The camp is great. The camp consistently gets 100% on NCS ratings and is top notch. In years past, food has been mediocre, but, with a new Food Service staff, is excellent. The emphasis is on building the troop's own program and promoting fun for Scouts of all ages.
J.P.    State List | Camp List

Camp Grimes

Great fun and adventure, not so good food.   State List | Camp List

Camp Palmetto - formerly Camp Bob Hardin

Dear Scouters,

The Palmetto Council's Camp Palmetto (formerly known as Camp Bob Hardin) is nestled in the mountains of western North Carolina, just off NC-74/26 near the town of Saluda.

There are a full range of programs offered to help Scouts along their trail to Eagle and beyond, from Upward Bound (for new Scouts) to C.O.P.E. and TREK (for older scouts), as well as the usual merit badge programs offered at other BSA camps (i.e., aquatics, handicraft, Scoutcraft, nature, fishing, horsemanship, & shooting sports, just to name a few), all designed for advancement in rank.

Scout leaders are also encouraged to participate in C.O.P.E. and various service projects around camp (I earned my "Scoutmaster's Merit Badge" patch by choosing from a list of "requirements").

Whitewater and tubing are also available at a minimal extra cost through local outfitters. Our troop had a blast tubing the Green River, which requires no skill but swimming. Be prepared for cool water temperature and some wading (when weather is unusually dry).

Want more? Take a hike to "Indian Fort" on one of the surrounding ridges, or to "Big Bradley" Falls. These are available at no cost.

The dining hall/kitchen is modern and the chow is good. Campers stay in permanent tent sites or adirondacks; I suggest the latter, if possible. Shower/Latrine facility is a short walk from your campsite.

The biggest "shock" to flatlanders like myself was the walking. It usually involves either going up or down hills. As is true in most mountain lakes (there are two in camp, one for boating & the other for swimming), the water temp hovered between 65-70 degrees F. As a challenge to my son and other Scouts, I completed the mile swim. The water temp really takes a toll on a 44-year-old (the last time I did this, I was 17), and can affect younger men too. My son D.J. (age 11) would not be outdone by his old man and also completed the mile.

Overall, this is a great camp. The staff is professional and well trained. We'll be back there the 2nd week in 2001.

In Scouting,
D.S., Scoutmaster,
Troop 37, Clover, South Carolina    State List | Camp List

Raven Knob Scout Reservation

(comment added 05/09/2003)

Every year our Troop votes to go to a different Summer Camp than the previous year. Spending six years in Scouting I have been to quite a few different Camps. As an Assistant Scoutmaster I have attended the last four years summer camps and other than the terrain I have found them all to be great Camps for one reason or another. Our Troop, based in Eastern North Carolina, has attended the National Jamboree, Philmont, Yorktown, Camp Bonner, Camp Daniel Boone, and Camp Raven Knob. When the Scoutmasters talk about past Camps and what they liked or what they didn't like, one Camp sticks out for the best reason. Camp Raven Knob is the one because the Staff was so great. We had some homesick youngsters that the staff really knew how to take care of. But the best part was the way our Scoutmasters were treated. We had our own lounge with internet hookup, telephone, pool tables, coffee pot, flush toilets, sofas, magazines, the list goes on, but that's not all. The Scoutmasters were treated to a genuine Indian Sweat Lodge complete with the history. (twice)We missed the first one. The staff took us out into the woods past a large fire ring filled with hot coals and basketball size rocks, into a low teepee where we circled a wash tub size hole in the center of the room. Glowing hot rocks were dropped into the hole and water was splashed on them to make steam. It was great! There was a partially dammed stream and a pool of cold mountain water a few paces away. We didn't get a lot of sleep that night but it was the best experience I have had at a Camp yet.

Raven Knob is North of Winston Salem on the Virginia line, offers high adventure as well as first year Scout stuff.

M.G., Assistant Scoutmaster    State List | Camp List

North Dakota

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Ohio

Camp Friedlander - Dan Beard Scout Reservation

comment added 05/09/03

[Camp is] located just outside Cincinnati, run by Dan Beard Council. It is located on the Dan Beard Scout reservation, which includes Camp Friedlander and Camp Craig and covers about 500 acres. Camp Craig has Cubworld, opened in 2000, great facilities, the pool is quite a hike, uphill both ways. Camp Friedlander reopened in 2003 for Boyscout Summer Camp. It has an air conditioned 500 seat dinning hall, 18 acre lake paid for by Marge Schott, pool, and a COPE course with a 60 foot rappelling/climbing tower. There is a first year camper program and all the standard summer camp MB's are offered. All facilities are new and nice. I prefer a pit toilet at camp, but I must admit the shower houses are nice. I attended this the first year and had a great time, as did my scouts. I would give it a strong B, with an AA+ very possible now that they have a year under their belt.

G.A.S., Scout Master
Troop 9, Norwood, Ohio    State List | Camp List

Camp Manatoc

Located in the Great Trail Council, near Akron, Ohio, Camp Manatoc Offers full-week Summer Camp June through August and private Troop camping the remainder of the year. The camp offers a great staff which offers many merit badges. They have programs in swimming and lifesaving, canoeing, rowboating, sailing, and motorboating, archery, rifle, black powder, and shot gun, rock climbing as well as all of the nature and environmental merit badges and many others. Hopefully they will get the barn rebuilt this year after an unfortunate fire, and they will be able to return to their horsemanship program. They offer a special "First Year Emphasis" for the younger Scouts. They have one of the few, if not only, certified C.O.P.E Courses in Ohio for the Older Scouts and leaders. They also have special weeks in August for Weebelos and Scouts on the Trail to Eagle.
Our Troop attends their summer camp every year and also several weekend camps there. I have not begun to describe the depth of the program or the beauty of the camp in this short e-mail, but hopefully I have encouraged you to investigate it further.
B.B., Assistant Scout Master
Troop 11 BSA, Akron, Ohio    State List | Camp List

Seven Ranges Scout Reservation

Seven Ranges Scout Reservation in Carroll County, Ohio, is by far the best Scout camp I've ever been to. The staff is extremely helpful, the program areas are wonderful and informative, and the camp itself is simply beautiful. There's always something to do, from the hikes and activities everyday to the Order of the Arrow and Pipestone camp honors program. Seven Ranges is truly quite an experience.
Troop 126, Canton, Ohio    State List | Camp List

Seven Ranges Scout Reservation

Several hundred acres in northeastern Ohio. Beautiful man-made lake. Excellent Pipestone camp honors program. Good merit badge program. Needs more focus on safety. One scout required plastic surgery after a July 1999 explosion rigged by the camp staff.
   State List | Camp List

Oklahoma

Camp Tom Hale

My troop visited Camp Tom Hale close to Taminga, Oklahoma, this past summer. It was our troop's second stay here and it still garnered high marks from both Scouts and Scouters. The terrain is steep and rocky. You will get exercise going from place to place. The swimming is great, in a lake with not only a Blob but an Iceberg for climbing and sliding off . The boating includes all types of boats. There is even snow skiing! The food is pretty typical Scout-camp fare; however, the dining hall is awesome. The area had three camps but closed two using all the monies to upgrade this one. The dining hall shows it. It has a/c plus a climbing wall on either end! The shooting sports include shotgun, rifle, archery and have a Scoutmaster's shootoff. They are very accomodating and bend over backwards to help you with any problem or request. If there is one drawback, it is how isolated the camp is. It is about 50 miles to any size town, but what beautiful drives. SLS, Troop 89
The Woodlands, Texas    State List | Camp List

Camp Tom Hale

Camp Tom Hale - Talihina, Oklahoma

The evaluations and comments were combined and averaged by 5 of our adults that attended camp.

In this evaluation, we used these ratings:
A = Excellent
B = Above Average
C = Average
D = Below Average
F = Unsatisfactory

Pre-camp information
Grade = B
The packets and continued information were a great help planning. Some of the items listed as needed were not needed at all. Some of items not listed, should have been mentioned. Paige at the council office was OUTSTANDING to work with in helping us prepare our trip.

Check in/out process
Grade = B
Very smooth but rather lengthy. Guides are assigned at arrival and took the troop on a tour and swim checks. We took 4 boys - 2 adults and two trailers' worth of equipment up one day earlier. The camp let us go to our campsite (had to promise to stay in our site - as camp was closed). This was a big help in getting our week off to a smooth start.

Our Campsite
Grade = C
Hale has grown in the last few years - they desperately need to expand the campsites. We were 45 people and had to share our site with another troop. All of the sites are right on top of each other. Makes it hard to run your troop activities without offending or disturbing other troop (and vice verse)

Latrine and Shower Facilities
Grade = A
Flush toilets and hot showers were nice!

Water
Grade = B
We brought several 5-gallon jugs of filtered water and kept them iced all week and maintained one full of Gatorade all week. The taste / temperature of the camp water was not very good. They did have water at all stations / classes.

Camp Administration
Grade = A
Great group to work with - extremely flexible and accommodating.

Camp Staff
Grade = A
All college age or older - many returning for past several years. Most counselors were teaching a badge in their field of study!

Merit Badge Program
Grade = B
Well run, rather "easy" on the requirements. Not sure if each boy really earned each badge on their own.

New Scout Program
Grade = B
Each Scout worked on rank advancement and still earned three merit badges (mostly the craft related ones). We usually avoid the new Scout programs - this one came highly recommended and worked very well.

Trading Post
Grade = C
Lots of candy and sodas. Prices were as expected at a camp trading post.

Food and Dining Hall
Grade = C
See comments below.

There were too many boys for the space available. The food was very geared for the boys. The camp only heated precooked items. most of which would not be approved for our troop campouts. They almost always had seconds to fill up the boys. They had few deserts to ingress the trading post revenue. The staff worked very hard to please, almost top hard, as there did not appear to be much of a bar to achieving merit badges. Almost no one did not finish badges started. The staff was older but not as high number of Boy Scouts as I have experienced in the past. This lead to a miss on the total Scout program; however, the quality of the staff was very high. The lake was an ideal size for the boating programs for the boys. The white water program got high marks from the boys. Blue cards were printed and handed out at check out which was very good with only a few errors. Over all a very good camping experience and the boys enjoyed some variety in merit badges not seen at other camps.

Pretty location, but camp overcrowded. Flush toilets nice, but high maintenance. Hot showers were wonderful. Nice dining hall with sub-mediocre food. Staff was good, but merit badge program quality very inconsistent.

Campsite was small for our group. We were somewhat cramped.

Camp Administration was very responsive and accommodating. Our troop's goal is to have 1st year Scouts complete the swimming merit badge which is different from Camp Hale's plan. They adjusted for us. This involved completely reworking the schedule for several Scouts. We also had several OA candidates participate in the Call Out ceremony and the Indian Nation Council accommodated our request. We appreciated this level of flexibility

Merit badge program offered some really cool stuff like snow sports and white water boating, and sailing. This kept our older Scouts interested. Overall Comments: I was very impressed. I appreciated the fact that, although the Ranch claimed to have copperheads, rattlers, bear, and mountain lions, we never saw one!

One suggestion is for them to promote interaction between the staff and the campers (apart from classes), and overall camp spirit. Something to make campers feel that they are a "well-cared for" part of the Ranch, rather than "well-cared for" guests at the Ranch.

Another suggestion is to NOT have coke machines.

Troop 226    State List | Camp List

Oregon

Camp Melakwa

comment added 08/19/02
I just got back from life on the Mountain, as it is called, and, wow!, the Melakwa staff was great. At this camp the troops cook their own meals and staff is cooked for by a professional cook. The program was great and some of our campers even got to climb a complete mountain, The Coveted Middle Sister! It was a wonderful camp and we will be back soon.

YIS
SM    State List | Camp List

Pennsylvania

Bashore Scout Reservation

Once again our Troop decided to return to Bashore Scout Reservation for summer camp in 2001. As ASM for the new Scouts, I highly recommend this camp. Throughout the week, I would "drop in" on the program areas to observe or help out if requested. The staff was excellent. Watching staffer Dave, who was only 18 himself, mesmerize twenty 11-year-olds with his knife and ax safety demo was inspiring. Now if I could only get him to tell me what he was saying while he was slow swinging the pocket watch. Something about you are getting sleepy, very sleepy. (grin) If you have a Troop made up of primarily younger Scouts, look into this camp. If you have a number of older boys looking for high adventure, you can find better elsewhere.
YIS,
E.W.H., Mount Joy, PA
   State List | Camp List

Camp Sinoquipe

Located at Ft. Littleton, Pennsylvania. Celebrated 50th anniversary last year. Has a man-made lake used for fishing, swimming and boating. Run by the Mason-Dixon Council headquartered in Hagerstown, Maryland. Has winter lodges used for group camping. Has central mess hall, first aid lodge, and Trading Post. Our Troop has attended the camp since it was opened. It has a camp song - The Sinoquipe Rouser. It also has a special song written by Warren Large, a former Scoutmaster and OA advisor.
GK, ex-Scoutmaster of Troop 17
Williamsport, Maryland    State List | Camp List

Camp Tuckahoe

Coming from Illinois for their summer camp in 1999, my troop and I felt like we were family there. They have wonderful programs, and the country is beautiful. Best part is they are only 27 miles north of Gettysburg NMP. It is a great camp.
V.F. Scoutmaster    State List | Camp List

Rhode Island

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South Carolina

Camp Old Indian

comment added August 28, 2002

Camp Old Indian is north of Greenville, just south of North Carolina border -- a very good camp that has some of the best merit badge instruction of any BSA Camp I have attended in past 10 years. The reason is that staff is primarily from the University of South Carolina Venture Post /OA Fraternity members. Some of the equipment, especially the rifles at the rifle range, need replacement. Food hall is first rate, staff eats at tables with units, and adirondacks are rustic and functional.Their High Adventure program was really enjoyed by our older Scouts since it was an off-camp site and included climbing, rappelling, whitewater, and C.O.P.E. activities. The camp is not real large and activities/classes are easily reached within five-minute walks. A plus is that within 20 miles is the trailhead to the "hills" trail through the Chatooga Wilderness. This is a 50-mile+ trek that rivals some of the best trails the East has for scenery and varied elevation. A perfect 50-mile walk/water trek for middle school Scouts that need a test but are not quite ready for Philmont challenge/altitude. A good training trek for leaders, crew chief, and crew. The OA fire ceremony dance is outstanding at this Camp.

J.M.    State List | Camp List

South Dakota

Medicine Mountain Scout Ranch

Located in the heart of the beautiful Black Hills at 6600 feet, even in the summer it can get cool at night. Using the camp as a base of operations, your Troop or Crew can have a great time in South Dakota. It is Patrol Method cooking, but the food is good and always enough to go around. Don't be surprised if you're waking up one morning and see an Elk come wandering thrugh your campsite.
I took my troop there in 1994, they still talk about it . ENJOY
V. F., Scoutmaster, Troop 161
Northlake, Illinois    State List | Camp List

Medicine Mountain Scout Ranch

(comment added 09/24/2002)

We're from Denver Area Council, and went to Camp Medicine Mountain, Black Hills Area Council this past July. Camp is great. Most troops visit Mt. Rushmore, but many do not know before they get there that the National Park Service lets Boy Scout Troops lower the flag in the amphitheater at the end of the nightly movie and light show!

Our troop took 34 boys to camp, and we lowered the flag on the Saturday night after camp in front of a packed house of more than 2,000 people. Our SPL also got to lead the entire crowd in the pledge of allegiance before the program began. The NPS was wonderful to work with and we highly recommend both the camp and the program!

J.U., Scoutmaster, T457, DAC    State List | Camp List

Tennessee

Skymont Scout Reservation

This is a fine camp in a beautiful location. The Project C.O.P.E. is excellent, and they plan to add an advanced C.O.P.E. next year. Their Polaris program (Tenderfoot through First Class emphasis) was very well run with competent counselors. All meals are in the dining hall, served family style, and are good, but there usually were no seconds on the meat dish. Proximity to cliffs, caves, and whitewater makes for good treks for older boys.
D.F., Scoutmaster, Troop 992
Sam Houston Area Council    State List | Camp List

Skymont Scout Reservation

My comment is on Skymont Scout reservation in Tennessee. Our troop attended the final week of summer 2001. The camp itself is very nice with excellent campsites and plenty of deer roaming very close to the sites. I was rather disappointed in some areas of the merit badge programs. I got the bad feeling that some areas were merely merit badge factories. A small number of the counselors showed little enthusiasm for the merit badge they were teaching. Face it, one 50 minute class is a little fast for a scout to earn the pottery merit badge. I was told that some of the staff departed for Jamboree and still others quit. I took that into consideration, but the boys came away from camp not quite satisfied. That's what it's all about ain't it?
E.M., ASM
Troop 440, Hahira, Georgia
   State List | Camp List

Texas

Buffalo Trail Scout Ranch

I feel that this is one of the best, if not the best, Scout camps on the planet. It is located in the beautiful Davis Mountains area of West Texas, and consist of 6,000+ acres of rugged terrain. The trails out of the canyon are very steep and challenging, but well worth the effort as the view is breathtaking from the summit. They run six weeks of camp every summer and accomodate Scout troops from throughout Texas and the Southwest. They offer horse cavalcade and outback programs, as well as full base camp advancement. The council website is www.btcbsa.org. Additional information is available at http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/buffalotrailscoutranch.
Yours in Scouting
J.J.    State List | Camp List

Buffalo Trail Scout Ranch

On the topic of Summer Camps, we attended Buffalo Trail Scout Camp in the Davis Mountains of Texas. It is the Council camp for the Midland / Odessa Council of Texas. Talk about rugged!!! You feel like you are in the middle of a Louis Lamar novel. The Camp Director is a fellow named Mark, who is a great personality and great with Scouts and adults alike. Sunday you are wondering what you got yourself into, and by Wednesday you love the place. Half-inch rebar and a 12-pound sledge hammer. along with an Adult strong enough and skilled enough to swing it, are the only way you will get tents set up. But Ranger Dan, a ten-year veteran of this camp, is working hard to develop a better surface to place the tents on. He is in hopes of having a grassy area in a few years. It is rock hard dust right now with very little rain in that area in the last 12 years. A spring up the Canyon will provide water for the campground in a short while if everything goes as planned. Aside from the rugged terrain and the 20- to 40-mile-per-hour winds that blow 10 minutes at a time from about midnight on, something about the place draws you back. It was like camping on the beach at Corpus Christi and missing being sandblasted after you left. A hard thing to explain.

The Program had some problems, but when we pointed them out they got fixed quick. Real great results. Geology and Astronomy were a disappointment. Only seven kinds of rock are available locally, but Mobil Oil sent a rock collection to help out; and, even though there is almost no light pollution in that area of the country, the narrow canyon rising 1000 feet around you restricts the view, but the Milky Way was still very visible.

The 100-degree days and 70-degree nights in that near desert environment were actually more comfortable than summer camp here in North Texas. We rarely get nights below 90 with night winds scarce.

Davis Observatory is a short 25 miles away, and they have Star Gazing parties on Tuesday and Saturday nights. Unfortunately they got a two-inch rain at the Observatory on Tuesday night, and they closed up shop and go home with a cloud cover and nothing to see.

The Trails are tougher than Philmont. I had two adults who did Treks at Buffalo Trails and have done Philmont. One is a Viet Nam Vet, Special Forces, and the other a retired Lt. Col. Both said Buffalo Trails was much rougher than Philmont. Elevation is between 4000 and 5000 feet, so you get a break that direction but the heat is much more challenging. The views were great but lacked the variety of Philmont. Both had a great time.

Buffalo Trails has a strong Horse Program with Horse Treks heading out twice in the week.

All my Scouts had a great time with the possible exception of my three older Scouts who allowed not wearing hats to become an issue and still is as they will all have to re-cycle to gain my signature on Scout Sprit.

I would advise making a stop at Balmorae State Park on the way in or the way out for nothing more than a swim in their 30-acre spring-fed, cold-water Civilian Conservation Corps-built pool. Truly the oasis of West Texas about 10 miles outside the camp gate.
Yours in Scouting,
J.M., Scoutmaster, Troop 86
Boy Scout Roundtable Commissioner
Roadrunner District
Longhorn Council, Bedford, Texas
   State List | Camp List

Buffalo Trail Scout Ranch

BTSR is the best scout camp I've ever been to. It's a great camp with a good staff. They have a great summer program with a variety of different merit badges to take. The camp is a great place to go. For my troop it was worth the 500-mile drive up there.
G.M., age 13
Life Scout, Troop 245
Cuero, Texas    State List | Camp List

Camp Grayson - Camp James Ray

Circle Ten Council changed the name of this camp to Camp James Ray within the past year.
R.R.    State List | Camp List

Camp Karankawa

Located near West Columbia, Texas, about a 75-minute drive south of Houston. The current program offers three long-term camp experiences: Traditional summer camp program (three weeks of Boy Scout Camp and two 3-day Webelos camps); a Fall Camp is offered for Boy Scouts who have a long Thanksgiving holiday (Friday night before Thanksgiving to Wednesday morning before Thanksgiving); and Winter Camp for BoyScouts from 26 Dec to 31 Dec.
   State List | Camp List

Camp Post

Paul,
I took 17 boys from my troop to Camp Post this June and all really enjoyed the camp. It had been closed for a couple of years for long term camp, but is making a good start again. I definitely would take my troop back; however, if they don't get their name out, they may not be able to get enough participation to continue to open.
YIS,
W.C., Scoutmaster, Troop 192
El Paso, TX    State List | Camp List

Camp Tonkawa

Chisholm Trail Council, Abilene, Texas

Camp Tonkawa, is located in the beautiful hills of Buffalo Gap, Texas, adjacent to Abilene State Park. The camp offers the basic merit badges and has a great first year program. The new addition of a climbing/rappelling tower will enhance the older boy program along with the C.O.P.E. course. The new cross country bicycle course was the biggest hit with the opening for the summer of 2001. Bicycles are provided, or you can bring your own. The (air-conditioned) dinning hall serves cafeteria style to keep waiting to a minimum. This was my second summer at camp, and I enjoyed it as much as the first time. There are activities and classes offered to the adults to keep them busy, or there is the air-conditioned lounge to do SM stuff in. All in all, the camp is well staffed and any problems are quickly dealt with.

J.J., Committee Member, Troop 296
Dyess AFB, Abilene,Texas    State List | Camp List

Cockrell River Camp - El Rancho Cima Scout Reservation

comment added 10/04/02

[What makes this camp so special is...] River camp is located on the beautiful Blanco River in some of the most dramatic landscape of Texas. The entire camp is located on what is called Devil's Backbone. Swimming, fishing, shooting sports, a new climbing wall and many other amenities.

G.F., Crew 161    State List | Camp List

George W. Pirtle Scout Reservation

During the week of June 9-15, 2002, our troop attended summer camp at the George W. Pirtle Scout Reservation near Gary, Texas. The camp, operated by the East Texas Area Council in Tyler, is 260 miles from where we live. This was our troop's second visit to Camp Pirtle as we last attended the camp in 1997.

This was my 23rd trip to summer camp. We had 32 boys, 1 female Venturer, and 10 adults at camp. From an overall standpoint, I believe Pirtle provides an excellent summer camp experience.

In this evaluation, I'm using these ratings:
A = Excellent
B = Above Average
C = Average
D = Below Average
F = Unsatisfactory

Pre Camp Information and Ease of Arranging the Trip
---------------------------------------------------
Grade = C
The leaders' guide is adequate. The only problem we had prior to the trip was that the council office misplaced our reservation form. However, this wasn't a significant problem as we were still able to get our first choice of camp dates. There seems to be a lack of communications between the Council office in Tyler and the camp, as the camp did not have a record of a payment and merit badge schedule (for one boy) that we sent in to the Council a month prior to our arrival. This didn't turn out to be a problem as the boy was able to get in the classes he desired.

Check in/out Process - Arrival & Departure
------------------------------------------
Grade: A
No problems and everything went well.

Our Campsite
------------
Grade = D
The campsite was nice but we had to share it with another troop which resulted in a very crowded site. We had the second largest contingent during our week at camp so being assigned to a larger campsite would have been nice.

Latrine & Shower Facilities
---------------------------
Grade = D
The latrine in our campsite was not very good. As the week progressed, there was significant odor. By the third week of camp, it will really be nasty. The shower house, shared by several sites, was nice but there was no hot water during the last two days. The East Texas Area Council needs to make significant improvements in this area.

Camp Administration
-------------------
Grade = A+
The best Camp Director/Program Director combination I've encountered while attending 23 summer camps. The Program Director was simply outstanding as he served as Program Director at the Philmont Training Center for several years. Overall, a very well-run camp with concerns addressed very quickly.

Camp Commissioner Program
-------------------------
Grade = N/A as the camp didn't have a Commissioner program.

Camp Staff
----------
Grade: B
Generally, the staff was excellent. There were one or two members not up to standard and I heard that one of these was dismissed prior to the end of the week. One of the staff members was an International Scout from Denmark and we really enjoyed spending time with him.

Merit Badge Program
-------------------
Grade: B
Generally, the merit badge classes were excellent and our Scouts enjoyed them. The shooting sports area was especially good. By the end of the week, it was apparent that instructors were not taking roll each day as boys were getting credit for work not done. The Program Director said he would fix this during future weeks. We didn't have any Scouts in the first year camper program but a couple of adults from other troops seemed to rate the program rather low as the boys were bored during the Monday session.

Activities for Older Scouts
---------------------------
Grade: A
We had four older boys in the C.O.P.E. program and they had a great time. Our female Venturer completed B.S.A. Lifeguard. There were rappelling and climbing programs too, with two towers including one that is 65 ft. high. The camp has a "blob" which the boys enjoyed, and provided lots of spare time for swimming, rifle shooting, shotgun shooting, etc. Camp Pirtle provided special daily times for adults to take part in the shooting and climbing programs too.

Special Activities
------------------
Grade: A
There were special activities each evening. "Follow Me Boys" was shown on Tuesday night. Actually, in my opinion anyway, there were too many special organized evening activities and it would have been nice to have one night free for troop activities in the campsite.

Chapel Progam
-------------
Grade: A+
The camp provided a 15-minute chapel program at 7 a.m. each morning. It was absolutely the best chapel or vespers program I've ever seen anywhere, including Philmont. The same individual has been leading this for about 15 years and he does an outstanding job.

Dining Hall and Food
--------------------
Grade: A
The food was as good or better than the food at any other camp I've attended. "Seconds" were available for all meals so there was no excuse for going away hungry. The dining hall is large and there are fun activities after each meal. One of our boys won the "latex glove milking" contest while another won the "fruit loop nose spitting" contest. I even successfully defended my 1997 title in the Scoutmaster's dance contest. Fortunately, no photos of this are available.

Trading Post
------------
Grade: B
Better than most trading posts but there were no camp mugs at Pirtle. Is this a new trend at other camps?

Other Buildings/Facilities
--------------------------
Grade: B
The camp has a nice, new campfire amphitheater. Other facilities were adequate.

Overall Grade: B+/A-
--------------------
Overall, we had a nice week at Camp Pirtle and our Scouts voted overwhelmingly to keep the camp in our summer camp rotation. The East Texas Area Council needs to improve the latrine facilities. The waterfront also has great untapped potential that could make Pirtle one of the top aquatics camps in Texas.

YiS,
CHG
Scoutmaster, Troop 405
Georgetown, Texas
   State List | Camp List

Horseshoe Bend Camp - El Rancho Cima Scout Reservation

Horseshoe Bend is a camp that is located on the Devil's Backbone just between Wimberley and Blanco on Ranch Road 32 and about 12 miles from San Marcos. The ranch that it is actually on is called El Rancho Cima (the ranch on the summit). Horseshoe has merit badges offered in areas such as aquatics, field sports, handicrafts,scoutcraft (skills), corrals, nature, and FCE. The staff there is very wonderful; they have great attiutde. The camp has 6 one-week sessions. The camp is a Sam Houston Area Council camp

K.W., Committee Member, Troop 315
Alamo Area Council    State List | Camp List

Worth Ranch

Worth Ranch is the oldest Scout camp in Texas with a lot of character. Our Troop has been there for the last three years. The staff is fantastic! A traditional summer program is offered. Very, very traditional.
   State List | Camp List

Utah

Beaver High Adventure Base

comment added August 19, 2002

BHAB is one of the best locations for a scout camp in the state of Utah. It is at a high elevation, so it has beautiful forests and cold, clear streams and lakes. Plus, it is away from the more crowded recreational areas up north. One thing not mentioned in your segment about the camp is that it also has a terrific winter program.

In the winter the roads are all closed. But the camp program continues on weekends. From the Christmas break until early March units of older Scouts come down to camp every Friday night. They drive up to a parking area along the highway about 2 miles out of camp. Then they are outfitted with cross country skis and they ski all the way in to the lodge, carrying light backpacks with sleeping bags and extra clothes. Night skiing on cross country skis is a challenge, but most of the Scouts do quite well. And there are contingency plans for those who have trouble.

At the lodge the staff have a dinner of beef stew and hot chocolate ready. Scouts relax around the wood burning stove and play games, or some even go back out for more night skiing. In the morning after a big pancake breakfast they head out for ski instruction on the practice hill, or go exploring around the area. They come back to the lodge for lunch, pack up and ski back to their cars. This is true high adventure, isolated away from civilization for a weekend of fun and fresh air. I've been taking scouts up skiing at Beaver off and on for over 20 years, and it is one of my favorite Scouting experiences.

Scoutmaster and former Varsity Scout Coach, RBM
Orem, Utah   State List | Camp List

Vermont

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Please send your camp comments in an email to campcomments@scoutcampsusa.com
with the camp name and state in the subject line.
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Virginia

Blue Ridge Mountains Scout Reservation

This is a review of our trip to the Blue Ridge Moutains Scout Reservation, http://www.bsa-brmc.org, in Virginia during July. We also spent 1-1/2 days touring Washington D.C. prior to camp. Our group consisted of 27 Scouts/Venturers and 13 adults. We participated in the summer camp program at Camp Powhatan plus six high adventure programs.

This was my 22nd trip to summer camp and the 11th different camp I've attended. In this evaluation, I'm using the ratings outlined in the evaluation form provided by the camp.
     A = Excellent
     B = Above Average
     C = Average
     D = Below Average
     F = Unsatisfactory

Camp Powhatan Programs
----------------------
Grade: B+
We had 3 adults and 3 Scouts. My wife and I helped with a Cooking merit badge class which ran out of propane. The Camp Quartermaster had none so we donated a canister brought by our troop so the class could continue. We visited several program areas and were impressed by most of them. I was especially impressed by Brownsea Island Program for new Scouts. The program was staffed entirely by Eagle Scouts. Our troop stopped participating in first year camper programs about ten years ago because they were not consistent and were rarely adequately staffed. I brought back materials from this program which I plan to share with my council's Scout Executive.

One aspect of camp which I found very annoying was one troop which seemed to have outfitted many of their Scouts and adults with 2-way radios. Having these things chime in during merit badge classes, leaders' meetings and at the dining hall was very annoying. I hope this isn't something that spreads to other camps as the summer camp experience would be terrible if several troops did something similar.

Camp Powhatan Staff
-------------------
Grade: A
So far as maturity and competence, probably the best staff I've seen at summer camps I've visited. Staff members seemed to be older than those at other camps we've attended. They used humor to keep the boys interested in the merit badge classes and, for the most part, seemed very competent.

Our Camp Site & Equipment
-------------------------
Grade: C
We had a nice campsite which we shared with Troop 45 from Dublin, Virginia. We really enjoyed our stay with the campers from Troop 45. The tents were average. We had one tent which leaked a good bit but we put duct tape on the holes and it didn't leak the next time it rained. The cots/springs were extremely poor. The camp needs to either spend money on new cots/springs or tell troops to bring their own cots. The shower house we shared with several other campsites was average.

Dining Hall & Food
------------------
Grade: C
The huge Dining Hall was nice but having ten people at each table was crowded when adults and larger Scouts were seated at the tables. The food was average compared to other camps I've attended. The scrambled eggs were terrible and the grits were bad too. Everything else was about the same as I've seen at other camps and high adventure bases.

Trading Post
------------
Grade: A
Other than the trading post at Philmont, Camp Powhatan's is the best I've seen. My only disappointment was not being able to purchase a Camp Powhatan mug as they were out of these.

Other Camp Powhatan Buildings/Facilities
----------------------------------------
Grade: B
If they had kept the central restrooms supplied with toilet paper and towels, this rating would have been an A.

Pre Camp Information and Ease of Arranging the Trip
---------------------------------------------------
Grade = F
This trip was the most difficult of the 40 long term camping adventures I've arranged. Our visit to the Blue Ridge Mountains Council's other camp, Camp Ottari in 1997, which I arranged but didn't attend, was the 2nd most difficult trip. The reason the trips are so difficult is the way in the council distributes the camp information. Instead of publishing a Leaders' Guide "up front" with all the information needed, they mail it out by program. They also kept changing the "rules" after issuing the information. For example, the medical forms needed for medications were changed and they required our High Knoll crew to submit new program choices two weeks prior to our departure for camp. The council needs to spend a whole lot more "up front" time planning their summer program, and it would certainly be much easier on their customers if they published one Leaders' Guide with all the information needed to prepare for summer camp and the various high adventure programs.

Check in/out Process - Arrival & Departure
------------------------------------------
Grade: F
This process was very poor. The map from I-81 to Camp Powhatan is poor and needs to be updated with correct distances. Providing written directions would also help. We could not get a Motorcoach weighing 20+ tons to the entrance of Camp Powhatan as the sign on the road states that 12 tons is the weight limit for the first bridge. The camp needs to let groups know this in advance.

The check in at Camp Powhatan was a disaster. All of our equipment, much of which needed to accompany our high adventure campers, was taken to our campsite but we were told it would be at the OA Building so that's where we went. We wound up finding the campsite and carrying the equipment for our high adventure participants from our campsite to the OA Building so they could be transported to Camp Ottari and the Claytor Lake Aquatics Base. This could have been avoided with better logistical planning by the camp administration. Our guide/host was very young and didn't know what to do with a group of 40 people who were participating in seven different programs. We didn't even get a tour of the camp. The check out process was better but we still had problems with the logistics with people returning from the high adventure programs. This needs better coordination.

New River Adventure Program
---------------------------
Grade: B by our three adults who stated there were safety concerns at the low C.O.P.E. Course and during White Water Canoeing.
Grade: A by youth members.
We had 3 adults and 5 youths in this program which is based at Camp Powhatan. The youths especially enjoyed it.

Fish Camp
---------
Grade: A-
This program is based at Camp Ottari. Other than the assistant leader not being as enthusiastic as he could have been ("burnt out" after several weeks???), our 1 adult and 2 Scouts thought this was an outstanding program. All three of them are "serious" fishermen and they were not disappointed.

Claytor Lake Aquatics Base
--------------------------
Grade: A+
This program is based at a leased facility on Claytor Lake. We had 2 adults and 6 youths in the program. They all thought it was outstanding, and I did too after seeing the base during the tour on Thursday. If I'm fortunate enough to be able to return, this is the program in which I want to participate.

SCUBA Certification
-------------------
Grade: A+
Based at Claytor lake, we had one 17 year old Scout/Venturer in this program. He attended Claytor Lake in 1997 and enjoyed his return immensely.

Mountain Man Outpost
--------------------
Grade: A
We had 5 Scouts in this program which is based at Camp Ottari. They had a blast! The program was much improved from 1997 when our Scouts assigned a D rating to it.

High Knoll Trail Backpacking
----------------------------
Grade: B
We had 4 adults and 5 youths in this program which is based at Camp Ottari. The youths were very young but they had an excellent time. The crew rated all of the outpost camps as outstanding. They said the latrines were terrible and that a better job could have been done in organizing and planning the actual backpacking part of the trip. One suggestion was that the camp develop itineraries, rated based upon hiking difficulty similar to what Philmont does, and let crews select from them prior to arrival.

From an overall standpoint, our group of 13 adults and 27 youths had a great time. The weather was outstanding and returning to the 100 degree days we're having in Texas makes me appreciate my stay at Camp Powhatan even more.

The Blue Ridge Mountains Scout Reservation is an excellent summer camp and high adventure base, the very best I've seen as far as variety and opportunity to participate in different programs. The Blue Ridge Mountains Council needs to put more work into "up front" information and in the arrival and departure logistics involved when troops take part in several high adventure programs. Even with these challenges, this was the best summer camp I've attended. Our PLC has already decided to sponsor a similar trip in 2004.

YiS,
C.H.G., Scoutmaster, Troop 405
Advisor, Venturing Crew 405
Georgetown, Texas
I used to be an Owl (WM-62-2-98 @ Philmont)
   State List | Camp List

Blue Ridge Moutains Scout Reservation

During the week of July 14-20, 2002, our troop attended summer camp at Camp Powhatan on the Blue Ridge Mountain Scout Reservation near Roanoke, VA. Twenty-four boys and five adults attended. This camp is about 350 miles from where we live and this was our first visit there. The main attraction of this camp is the numerous programs that are offered. We had boys in three of the different programs.

In this evaluation, I'll use these ratings:
A = Excellent
B = Above Average
C = Average
D = Below Average
F = Unsatisfactory

Pre-camp information
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade = B
The leader's guide was pretty well done. It explained most things and included lists of the exact paperwork the camp would require. The registrar at the office was very helpful during my three changes to numbers in the various programs.

Check in/out process
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade = D
Our assigned guide during check in did not tell us the things we needed to know (like the dining hall procedures, how to check items out from the quartermaster) and did tell us things that were incorrect (who needed to take their swimming test on the first day). We planned on leaving early (7:00 AM) on Saturday, so I made arrangements to check out Friday night. No one ever showed up to do our final inspection on Friday or Saturday a.m. I asked the program director about this and he said we were to just leave.

Our Campsite
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade = D
The tents had some holes in them that were patched with duct tape. Luckily, it did not rain for more that 15 minutes all week. We only had one dining fly for 29 people, again we were lucky it didn't rain very much. The platforms for the tents were in disrepair. If we had a rain-filled week, it would have been miserable.

Latrine and Shower Facilities
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade = D
Our latrine, as well as at least two others, were overflowing during the week. The camp did send someone out to pump them, but that should have been done before they began to overflow. Our assigned shower facilities were in need of maintenance. We ended up showering at the facilities for another troop. Also, shower houses were shared by troops, making cleanliness tougher to manage. There were no dedicated female leader facilities that I saw. The shower house had sign to flip for male or female use.

Water
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade = F
I put this category in here because the water was terrible. The water at our camp site was undrinkable because it tasted so strongly of iron. The water at the dining hall was filtered and was slightly better, but the dining hall staff was so unaccommodating that it was difficult to get water there. After our third case of dehydration, we went to Wal-mart and purchased cases of bottled water for the scouts to drink.

Camp Administration
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade = B
Camp Director and Program Director were mostly responsive to our concerns. The staff was mostly well trained. The adult leaders in camp for the week were constantly being asked to do jobs that we felt were clearly the responsibility of the staff. When we declined, because we felt we needed to attend to our own responsibilities (our Scouts), we were verbally hassled by the staff. A number of training programs were offered for adults and plans are being made to include even more next year.

Camp Staff
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade = B
The program staff was excellent. The surly dining hall staff kept this from being an A.

Merit Badge Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade = B
Generally, the merit badge program was very good. The Scouts did the requirements as listed. Most of the counselors knew the subject matter and worked at improving their teaching techniques. I think our Scouts asked me to make special mention of all of their counselors (except for one) on the camp report card we handed in.

New Scout Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Grade = A
The Brownsea Island program at Camp Powhatan is OUTSTANDING. We had 12 boys in this program and all the adults were impressed. The other troops in camp also gave this program rave reviews. This program really stressed the patrol method and Scout spirit. Along the way, the Guide (a staff member) taught them various skills that related to the Tenderfoot through First Class requirements. Dan, our Scouts' guide and only going into 11th grade, was an outstanding instructor and role model for our new boys.

New River Adventure Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade = B
The New River Adventure is one of the high adventure programs for older Scouts. We had three boys take this program and enjoy COPE, whitewater rafting, canoeing, caving, and climbing and repelling. They had a great time but thought the canoeing was lame (this was the day after the rafting trip though). This program is coed, as many Venturing Crews take part. Our guys thought this was a plus. ;^)

Trading Post
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grade = A
A whole lot of good stuff. Puts many Council scout shops to shame.

Food and Dining Hall
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Grade = F
The food was edible but was by no means good. Our main complaint was with the disorganization of the dining hall and the surliness of the dining hall staff. Meal time was mass confusion and the staff was downright obnoxious. I saw Scoutmasters have to "get in the face" of the staff after they were screaming at the kids for taking too much time to put syrup on their french toast. Portions were insufficient for adults and older boys. Seconds were not available. Twice we had to go to town and purchase additional food to supplement what we were fed. At one breakfast those at the end of the line could only have milk or OJ, not both like those at the front of the line. I found this unacceptable because they knew exactly how many people were in camp for the week and therefore how many of these items to order. We found Camp Powhatan's dining experience bad.

Overall we found Camp Powhatan's programs to be great, but they were diminished by the poor physical amenities. The Blue Ridge Mountain Council would be well served by spending some money to upgrade their tents and platforms and by figuring a way to improve the dining hall.

E.H., SM Troop 281 Lancaster, PA   State List | Camp List

Blue Ridge Moutains Scout Reservation

comment added August 20, 2002
We also attended Powhatan this summer (week of July 4); I will use the same format as E.H. did, but also compare with Camp Ottari (another camp in the Blue Ridge Scout Reservation) four years ago and with Claytor Lake (the Blue Ridge Reservation's Aquatic Camp) during all of the last three years. The views expressed are a synthesis of the views I heard, and are not reflective of any of our individual perspectives. We attended with 15 boys and fouir adults.

In this evaluation, I'll use these ratings:
A = Excellent
B = Above Average
C = Average
D = Below Average
F = Unsatisfactory

Pre-camp information
Grade = C
Ottari B, Claytor Lake B

We were told at camp that since we had more than three boys in the Brownsea Island program, we would have to provide an adult to the program. There was no indication of this in the pre-camp information.

Check in/out process
Grade = C
Ottari B, Claytor Lake C

As others have noted, the assigned guide did not tell the troop much of what it needed to know.

Campsite
Grade = D
Ottari B, Claytor Lake A

The tents had some holes in them that were patched with duct tape; opthers did not have tabs for tying up flaps. One tent was collapsed completely. Though the guide assured us it would be fixed, this did not ocur for two days (one of the troop adults did it). There was no dining fly. The camp had not made certain that there was sufficient space for all troop boys and adults - we had some discussions with an adjacent troop that was overspaced. There was no dining fly in our site. Cots were in a state of significant disrepair; we mended many of them adequately with twine from home.

Latrine and Shower Facilities
Grade = D
Ottari, C, Claytor Lake, B

Water
Grade = F
Ottari F, Claytor Lake B

We expected this, and had brought several cases of botttled water.

Camp Administration
Grade = C/D
Ottari A, Claytor Lake A

The Camp Director and Program Director were concerned, but apeared unable to adequately address problems. This is made clear by the experiences of those that attended camp in subsequent weeks.

Camp Staff
Grade = F
Ottari A, Claytor Lake A

The program staff was for the most part excellent, but management of the swim area was poor. When one of our adults volunteered as a lifeguard, he was given a nonswimmers area with 18 boys, while two youth on staff watched a swimmer's area with 6 boys. Swimmers were allowed into the swim area until the buddy board was full, regardless of the number of guards. IMHO, these are such serious irregularities as to fail the camp. I observed serious difficulties with staff at high C.O.P.E. (failure to adequastely inspect harnesses on the "flying Squirrel"), and administrative distractions on low C.O.P.E. that left the boys twiddling thumbs for long periods. The remainder of the staff was excellent -- particularly the new scout program.

Merit Badge Program
Grade = B
Ottari A, Claytor Lake A

New Scout Program
Grade = A
We did not use the new scout program at Ottari, and there is no such program at Claytor Lake.

New River Adventure Program
Grade = B

High C.O.P.E. was excellent with exception of safety issue above. Low C.O.P.E. mediocre. Caving good, though many headlamps were damaged and should have been discarded. Climbing and rapeling facilities and staff very good. Whitewater canoeing very tame (marginally class 2 rapids). Too many Scouts were on this trip, due to poor division of units by camp staff. Progress was slow; many Scouts did not have adequate canoeing skills - one pair of boys in our unit righted seven other canoes. Whitewater rafting on the New River is excellent. This is easily worth the additional cost of the program.

Trading Post
Grade = B
Ottari, C, Claytor Lake has no trading post.

A whole lot of stuff, but few unique items. Food at the trading post better than at dining hall, but very limited in variety. Root beer floats the most popular item. Nevertheless, the older boys did not find it very interesting.

Food and Dining Hall
Grade = C/D
Ottari F, Claytor Lake A

Although I heard complaints about portion size, any Scout or adult that ate everything given him would have had a nutritionally adequate and balanced diet. Much food is wasted though, because it is served up whether or not it will be eaten. Dinging hall procedures are annoying, as is the dining hall staff. We expected problems after Ottari; it is clear that the council has no intention of improving this problem. Our Scouts are unlikely to ever again attend either Ottari or Powhattan, though I expect them to return to Claytor Lake year after year. If you attend Powhattan/Ottari, plan to go into town and do patrol cooking; skip the dining hall!

Our boys voted to return to Treasure Island for camp next year.

T.O.    State List | Camp List

Camp Lions

(comment added 10/04/2002)

Our troop just returned from a week at Camp Lions in the Tidewater Council of Virginia. 20 boys, 6 adults, 65 completed badges, 11 partials -- most easily complete-able. Overall a great week.

This was our first year at this camp, and we were initially drawn by their New Scout program -- which lived up to our expectations. New Scouts spend 2 hours a day in this program, which leaves time for 3 merit badge classes. They also offer a "Finish First" course, where Scouts who just need those last few requirements can work to get them done -- one of our Scouts participated in this class and will have his Board of Review on Tuesday.

Camp Lions also offers a few unique merit badges, such as Archaeology (working a nationally registered site on the camp) and Oceanography. Another draw was their Pottery/Sculpture class in which boys earned 2 badges for the time of one (neither of which is offered at our Council camp that we've attended for the past 4 years). Swimming activities are held at the pool, boating activities on the James River.

This was our first year ever at a dining hall (we've done patrol cooking at our own council camp) and the food was pretty good for the most part, though heavy on the starchy stuff (but that's what the boys like anyway). Some of our big boys were still hungry after a few of the meals early in the week, before we learned to go scavenging from other tables. Picky eaters could get a pizza or pretzel later in the Trading Post to supplement if needed. We all had foil dinners in our sites one night, too, which our troop supplemented with more potatoes and some grilled cheese sandwiches.

Our troop doesn't have "seasoned" high adventure types, but we did have 2 older Scouts participate in the Historic Outpost Trek (HOT). They camped in a completely separate camp, did patrol cooking, and biked 131.8 miles over 4 days, earning their Cycling MB in the process. They were able to get showers at our camp, and also took time to do some canoeing, swimming and to hit the climbing tower. They traveled throughout this historically significant area, hitting Williamsburg, Chippokes Plantation State Park (where they got to spend some time in the Olympic-sized pool) and even took the ferry across the river on one of their jaunts. They had a great week.

The other "older Scout" program offered by Camp Lions (every other week) is the Captain John Smith program, where Scouts work to build a fort, etc.

We felt the leader facilities at the camp were pretty good -- separate shower facilities for the ladies, air conditioned leader restrooms at the admin building. The boys really enjoyed having a pool rather than a lake to swim in. One more thing they liked -- the air conditioned handicraft shelter! (Heat index was over 100 daily, but cooled enough for comfortable sleeping at night.) The camp is flat except for going down to the river -- a big change from our own council camp in the Virginia mountains. It's also relatively compact so it's easy to make it to classes on time, even if one happens to run a little late.

The only thing that would prevent our troop from returning -- the admin building isn't manned all the time, which means leaders don't have ready access to a phone all the time. Luckily, the one time I had a minor crisis that absolutely could not wait, one of the commissioners happened by and let me use his cell phone.

G.F., SM, Troop 1420, NCAC    State List | Camp List

Claytor Lake Aquatics Base

CLAB is one of three Blue Ridge Mountain Council camps located within half an hour's drive of each other. CLAB is an aquatics-only program for scouts 13+. Claytor Lake is a several thousand acre impoundment of the New River near Radford, Virginia. Small boat sailing, motorboating, water skiing & rowing are the merit badges available. Scouts are organized into provisional crews and rotate among the MB courses, plus snorkeling, sailing on a large boat, and evening water activities consisting of being towed behind a boat on a tube or "rocket" with a sadistic boat driver whose goal is to toss you off so someone else can have a turn. One can also spend the entire week in a scuba certification course, but that course leaves little time for anything else.

CLAB is organized so that Scouts can be part of a "provisional unit;" adult leaders are welcome, but are not required. This is a camp that an individual Scout can attend. If part of your unit is more interested in a traditional summer camp experience, the unit can attend one of the nearby camps and leave the aquatic Scouts here. Adults have no responsibilities, so my experience was along the lines of a low-budget "ClubMed" week. Camp staff are all aged 21 and over and really know their stuff. They are friendly and incredibly long suffering with Scouts whose parents may have strongly encouraged attendance, but who would rather be home on the couch pushing buttons. The food is also superb.
P.B.    State List | Camp List

Lenhok'sin Trail - Goshen Scout Reservation


5 Star Rating!!
Troop 500 of Capitol Hill (National Capitol Area Council) took a crew of 6 13 year olds to L.H. the summer of 2000 and found the experience to be fantastic. The hiking is not too demanding so it makes a wonderful introductory or intermediate hiking experience. The cultural and sports venues at the outpost were well staffed as was the beginning orientation.    State List | Camp List

Washington

Fire Mountain Scout Reservation

Fire Mountain is a great camp. It has many areas offered, including an Indian lore area, archery range, black powder range, .22 range, a swimming beach, a separate boat beach, a climing wall, scoutcraft area, nature area, and crafts. I love this camp!

PS: their web site is www.firemtn.org
   State List | Camp List

West Virginia

Be the FIRST to review a camp in this state!
Please send your camp comments in an email to campcomments@scoutcampsusa.com
with the camp name and state in the subject line.
   State List | Camp List


Wisconsin

Camp Decorah

Located just north of LaCrosse, Wisconsin, Camp Decorah offers dining hall, and one in-site meal, one of the best C.O.P.E. courses in the nation, a great merit badge program, and a super staff.
S.K., Assistant Scoutmaster    State List | Camp List

Camp Shin Go Beek

Camp Shin Go Beek is one of those places that God made special. We are over 50 years old now and getting still stronger. It offers dinning hall eating and one of the best merit badge programs. Camp Shin Go Beek is located in the heart of the sand counties of Wisconson, 200 miles north of our council.
V.F. Scoutmaster
Des Plaines Valley council    State List | Camp List

Hanna Venture Base

Our Crew just returned from Hanna Venture Base, Samoset Council, Rhinelander, Wisconsin. WOW is all we can say. They run three summer programs and weekend programs in the winter.

Our Crew decided on the southern trek (can you say horses?). Our first day we met the other Crew that was accompanying us on our trek. We set up camp at the base, then went to Tesomas Scout Camp to work on a few team building exercises on the low COPE course.

Monday we loaded up the van and trailer and drove to a private cave for a beautiful afternoon underground (was 95F outside). We then went to a small campground to stay the evening.

Tuesday we were off to go horseback riding. The ranch where we rode was a working dairy farm. We not only had a wonderful time riding, but were treated with a tour of the dairy farm. From there we drove to Devil's Lake State Park and set camp.

Wednesday, the director and the climbing expert met us and set up a climb on real rock. We had only climbed indoor walls before. The afternoon was spent hiking UP to Devil's Doorway. I thought I would die. I am not quite as young as the rest, and it was a real test to keep up.

Thursday the youth mountain biked early, then we went bouldering. That was my cup of tea! I know what mountain goats feel like now! Once we were tired out, we headed west to Camp Decorah by LaCrosse, Wisconsin.

Friday we bravely attacked Decorah's 65-foot High COPE course. It was a real challenge considering we were all sore and tired from the great week we experienced. Once we returned to Hanna, we were greeted by steak, potatoes, chicken, and strawberry shortcake. Wow! Saturday was a sad day. We all said our good-byes and started the long trip home.

We have planned for 2004 to do the Southern Trek during the first week as training for the Northern Trek during the second week. It is backpacking in the Porcupine Mountains on Lake Superior, a day of rock climbing, then into the sea kayaks for two days exploring the Apostle Islands. Our Crew is fired up, and ready to promote this to other members of our Crew and all other Crews they come in contact with.

It was a great time, the cost was very reasonable, and the staff are now friends for life.

Yours in Venturing,
JAW
Crew 2349 Advisor
Aldersgate United Methodist Church
Fort Wayne, Indiana    State List | Camp List

Ma-Ka-Ja-Wan Scout Reservation

After spending only one week at Ma-Ka-Ja-Wan I knew that I had fallen in love. The incredible atmosphere and the enthusiastic staff makes this camp stand out in my mind more than any camp. I will continue to go to Ma-Ka-Ja-Wan and recommend it to new leaders.
T.R.    State List | Camp List

Ma-Ka-Ja-Wan Scout Reservation

I am a veteran Scouter. I have camped with scouts and/or worked at every major Scout Reservation in America and two in Canada. It is with all honesty that I tell you about Makajawan Scout Reservation. In a few words, the motto of the entire camp is "What can we do to help you and your scouts." At every Leaders' meeting, which are held every day, this question is the foundation of the entire camp operation. Do your Scouts need help with program? Then, this is the place for your Scouts. Do some need individual help on Merit Badge work? Then this is the place for your Scouts. Are you looking for a great Dining Hall program? Then, this is the place. Do your Scouts want "seconds" at each and every meal? Then this is the place for your Scouts. Lastly, are you looking for the best Campfire and Order of the Arrow call-out program you or anyone else has ever seen? Then this is the place for you. You will not believe the Great things that that happen at Makajawan, until you camp there with Scouts.

J.F.    State List | Camp List

Ma-Ka-Ja-Wan Scout Reservation

(comment added 09/24/2002)

For 8 years I have attended summer camps here. The location is beautiful and the benefit to the boys is so great that I have attended twice without any of my sons. Trailblazer program for younger boys to boost them on their advancement trail. Merit Badge program for all age boys. Special opportunities for more experienced scouts from MB class in small boat sailing, motorboating, out-of-camp adventures either backpacking to Porcupine Mountains or 3-day canoe trip on Flambeau River. Best time to see OA call out ceremony is end of week 3. (also offered week 1 & 5 but best is week 3)

Bored with regular camp program? Challenge yourself to the Triathalon -- mile swim, mile run to kayaks, kayak the lake and mile run back to start. Or try the MaKaJaWan Ironman. Walk the 20 mile Boundary Trail on one day, next day do the mile swim and finish with the Wilderness overnighter. Friendly troop/campsite competitions in the war canoes each week. Take the whole troop on a white water rafting trip for an afternoon out of camp, arranged by camp staff.

Food, always decent, has improved each of the last several years. One night Scoutmasters cook bratwurst & hotdogs so staff can be off. (Staff still prepares the salads & dessert to be served by adult leaders). In return, the staff entertains the boys one night and feast the Scoutmasters with a steak dinner.

There are two sides to camp -- East camp and West Camp. East Camp has original dining hall, more scenic, and terrain is fairly hilly. You'll catch your breath by end of day two. West Camp is flatter, dining hall is more modern, less picturesque. Both sides offer identical program. I've camped several years on both sides and prefer East Camp. I think it cools down at night better and you feel more secluded from other campsites. There is a seperate family camp area with cabins for rent for Scouter families that want to vacation while offering support to troop.

C.S., Committee Chair    State List | Camp List

Napowan Adventure Base

comment added 08/17/02

I have been to six different summer camps in my four years in scouting, and I have seen all different types of camps all around the midwest. Napowan is a humongous camp with two separate waterfronts (one for boating, fishing, etc. and one for swimming), they have the BSA's only working metal forge, along with offering pottery, candle-making, and other different, out-of-the-ordinary Merit Badges. They offer a leadership-building course (Project C.O.P.E.), and with their great staff it all comes together to become one of the premier BSA camps in the midwest.

K.S.
Troops 349/369
   State List | Camp List

Wyoming

Camp Buffalo Bill

(comment added 09/24/2002)

We went to Camp Buffalo Bill, outside Cody, Wyoming in 2000. Camp is located about 10 miles outside the east gate of Yellowstone National Park. It was a wonderful camp and trip for our troop. Camp director was very good and very helpful. We had a week of summer camp (dining hall due to bears) then stayed an extra 5 days to sightsee in Yellowstone -- we never had to move our tents as camp placed us in a campsite we could just stay in for the extra time.

We never saw a bear -- testimony to the seriousness that staff takes with bear precautions and teaching boys the same, but we did have a moose wander through camp.

Has a very, very small lake, so aquatics isn't the draw. We found the draw to be the staff. Average age of staffers was 18 or 19. Had a world class climbing instructor heading up their older boy high adventure program, were set up to let a Troop take a raft trip on the mid-week day (we did that and had a ball!!).

Overall a really great camp.

J.U., Scoutmaster, T457, DAC    State List | Camp List

Alphabetical List of Camp Comments

Or, click here for a list of states.
Bashore Scout Reservation
Beaver High Adventure Base
Blue Ridge Moutains Scout Reservation
Bonner Scout Reservation
Broad Creek Memorial Scout Reservation
Buffalo Trail Scout Ranch
Camp Alexander
Camp Bob Hardin (formerly) - now Camp Palmetto
Camp Buckskin
Camp Bud Schiele
Camp Buffalo Bill
Camp Cedars
Camp Chawanakee
Camp Chief Little Turtle
Camp Comer
Camp Crooked Creek
Camp Decorah
Camp Fleischmann
Camp Frank Rand
Camp Friedlander - Dan Beard Scout Reservation
Camp Geiger
Camp Grayson - Camp James Ray
Camp Greenough
Camp Grimes
Camp Horne
Camp Jackson
Camp James Ray - Camp Grayson
Camp Karankawa
Camp Kunatah - Ten Mile River Scout Reservation
Camp Lions
Camp Loll
Camp Lowden
Camp Lumpkin-Chattahoochee Scout Reservation
Camp Madron
Camp Manatoc
Camp Marin-Sierra
Camp Melakwa
Camp NoBeBosCo
Camp Oest
Camp Old Indian
Camp Oljato
Camp Orr
Camp Palmetto - formerly Camp Bob Hardin
Camp Pioneer
Camp Post
Camp Potomac
Camp Potosi
Camp Roosevelt
Camp Saffran
Camp Sequassen
Camp Sequoyah (Alabama)
Camp Shands
Camp Shin Go Beek
Camp Sidney Dew
Camp Sinoquipe
Camp Spencer
Camp T.L. James
Camp Tom Hale
Camp Tonkawa
Camp Tres Ritos
Camp Tuckahoe
Camp Wabeeka
Camp Wanoket
Camp Wilderness
Camp William Hinds
Cape Cod Maritime Adventure
Chattahoochee Scout Reservation-Camp Lumpkin
Claytor Lake Aquatics Base
Cockrell River Camp - El Rancho Cima Scout Reservation
Curtis S. Read Scout Reservation
Dan Beard Scout Reservation - Camp Friedlander
El Rancho Cima Scout Reservation - Cockrell River Camp
El Rancho Cima Scout Reservation - Horseshoe Bend Camp
Florida National High Adventure Sea Base
Fire Mountain Scout Reservation
Gerber Boy Scout Camp
George W. Pirtle Scout Reservation
Hanna Venture Base
Horseshoe Bend Camp - El Rancho Cima Scout Reservation
H. Roe Bartle Scout Reservation
Lenhok'sin Trail/Goshen Scout Reservation
Ma-Ka-Ja-Wan Scout Reservation
Medicine Mountain Scout Ranch
Napowan Adventure Base
Northwoods Scout Reservation
Onteora Scout Reservation
Owasippe Scout Reservation
Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch
Quivira Scout Ranch
Raven Knob Scout Reservation
S Bar F Scout Ranch
Seven Ranges Scout Reservation
Skymont Scout Reservation
Summit Base
Ten Mile River Scout Reservation - Camp Kunatah
Theodore Naish Scout Reservation
Thunder Scout Reservation
Wehinahpay Mountain Camp
Winn-Dixie Scout Reservation-Camp La-No-Che
Worth Ranch
 

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